Turn of a Century An exhibition of works from Berlin at the turn of the millennium, with André Butzer, Björn Dahlem, Thilo Heinzmann, Thomas Helbig, Andy Hope 1930, Erwin Kneihsl, Markus Selg and Thomas Zipp

14 November 2015–21 January 2016
Turn of a Century, 2015
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Markus Selg, Björn Dahlem, André Butzer
Turn of a Century, 2000
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Markus Selg
Turn of a Century, 2015
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Björn Dahlem, Thomas Helbig
Turn of a Century, 2001
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Thomas Helbig
Turn of a Century, 2000
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Thomas Zipp
Turn of a Century
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Schwarzes Loch (M-Sphären), (2001) 2015
Björn Dahlem

Wood, lamps, light bulbs, fluorescent lights, vacuum cleaner
dimensions variable

 

Turn of a Century, 2015
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Thilo Heinzmann, Erwin Kneihsl
Alexanderplatz, 1999
Erwin Kneihsl

Gelatin silver print, collage, single edition, 317 pages
38,5 x 27,5 x 10 cm

 

Friedens-Siemens IV, 2000
André Butzer

Oil on canvas
210 x 155 cm

Machiavelli Transfer, 2000
Andy Hope 1930

Watercolour, light pen, ballpoint pen, pencil on paper
29,5 x 20,5 cm
 

Andy Hope 1930, 2000

The Trees are ...
Oil, collage, pencil on paper
29,5 x 20,5 cm

STURM at Lake Placid, 2000
Thomas Zipp

Mixed media on muslin
200 x 145 cm

Rendezvous (Ersatz), 2000
Markus Selg

Digital print, collage on paper, framed
153 x 103 cm

O.T., 1999
Thilo Heinzmann

Pigment, epoxy resin on styrofoam behind plexiglass cover
151,5 x 201,5 x 9 cm

Ikone, 2000
Thomas Helbig

Oil on canvas, framed
155 x 133 cm

Untitled, 2001
Erwin Kneihsl

Gelatin silver print, collage, single edition, framed
57 x 44 cm

In many places around the world the millennial period was characterised by a spirit of optimism. Not so in Berlin. Here, any hopes and expectations for the new millennium were dampened by the general malaise that followed the euphoria of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Its debts were at record levels, the economy was stagnating and various scandals had undermined trust in politics. There was no trace of optimism about the future.

Besides the internationally acclaimed Berlin club scene, the only other branch of city life to flourish in this milieu was the culture industry, and especially the art scene, which had been in the ascendant ever since the mid-nineties. Its growth was driven by artists and galleries. Drawn to the freedom and openness of the city, the artists had come in their droves and from all corners. Meanwhile, ever-increasing numbers of new galleries had been opening their doors, predominantly in Berlin-Mitte, where they took on many of the artists who were now resident in the city. Between them, the artists and galleries working in Berlin at the turn of the millennium not only managed to win back the city’s former status as the artistic capital of Germany, but also paved the way for it to become, for a while at least, the global capital of contemporary art.

This exhibition brings together works by eight artists, all of whom were part of that development and had a formative influence on the programme at Galerie Guido W. Baudach: André Butzer, Björn Dahlem, Thilo Heinzmann, Thomas Helbig, Andy Hope 1930, Erwin Kneihsl, Markus Selg and Thomas Zipp. All of them came to the city on the Spree in the mid to late-nineties, enriching the art scene with the knowledge and influences they brought with them and with a spirit of innovation that fell on extremely fertile ground in the Berlin of those days. Thomas Helbig and Andy Hope 1930 had studied in Munich and London, where both had been involved with a loose artists’ collective known as the Deutsch-Britische Freundschaft and its renowned series of exhibitions. Thilo Heinzmann and Thomas Zipp came to Berlin as former students of Thomas Bayerle at the Städelschule in Frankfurt and shared his interest in the cultivation of a contemporary painting practice. André Butzer and Markus Selg moved to Berlin from Hamburg in 1999 when their already legendary Akademie Isotrop, an independent artists’ group with an autonomous teaching programme covering the broadest possible array of disciplines, disbanded after five highly productive years. Björn Dahlem and Erwin Kneihsl also came to Berlin around that time: one as a young graduate of the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf and former member of the HobbyPop group, the other, almost twenty years his senior, as an artist who had first moved to Berlin in the mid-seventies and was now returning having studied photography at the Graphische Lehr- und Versuchsanstalt in Vienna.

The photographs, collages, drawings, paintings and sculptures exhibited here were all made between 1999 and 2001. In both form and content they attest to the breadth and depth of artistic production in Berlin at that time, but they also demonstrate how artists in Berlin at the turn of the millennium were consciously engaging with art-historical tradition and, without making any concessions to prevailing trends, actively exploring new forms of expression and creativity in contemporary art.

André Butzer, for instance, stepped up to the plate to create his own cosmos in paintings. On show in this exhibition is his Friedens-Siemens IV, one of the first Berlin pictures from the series of the same name. Painted in the year 2000, this mostly black-and-white portrait of an amiable species of bodiless walking heads marked the transition to a new phase in Butzer’s work. The Friedens-Siemense went on to become the central characters in his sci-fi expressionism of the noughties, populating the utopian world of Nasaheim together with other comic-like beings.

Björn Dahlem’s sculptural works from this period also took the heavens as their subject matter. In terms of both form and content, the installation Schwarzes Loch (M-Sphären) is one of his early ‘signature’ pieces. Originally exhibited at the Kunsthalle St. Gallen in 2003, then destroyed in a fire at the museum Hamburger Bahnhof, this work, the first of Dahlem’s vast visualisations of the dark giants of space, has been especially reconstructed for this exhibition.

Thilo Heinzmann’s O.T. also represented a new departure for the artist when it was made in 1999. Just a year prior to this Heinzmann’s efforts to renew the practice of painting had led him to the discovery of polystyrene as a potential painting substrate. He began using it for red and black monochrome compositions in pigmented epoxy resin, sometimes dripped, sometimes rolled.

Thomas Helbig’s Ikone of 2001, a painting that manages to be both sketchy and full of detail, is another prototypical work insofar as it combines the two influences that still feed into his diverse artistic practice even now: European folk art and the early avant garde. Their shared roots remain a constant spur to his work.

When Andy Hope 1930 first arrived in Berlin at the turn of the millennium the works he made alternated between painting, drawing and collage. This exhibition includes Machiavelli Transfer and The Trees are… from the year 2000 - two previously unseenexamples of the sort of work that would subsequently become so typical of the artist: adaptations of super-hero comics, splatter stories, fantasies and science fiction that incorporate these genres into the field of contemporary art.

Erwin Kneihsl’s monumental artist’s book Alexanderplatz (1999) stands at the centre of this exhibition. Its many black-and-white photographs, some consisting of multiple overlapping layers, provide an unadorned and yet artistically stylised documentation of everyday life at the turn of the millennium in Berlin’s most urban location. Like Alfred Döblin’s epic novel of the same name seventy years before, Kneihsl’s Alexanderplatz pays tribute to the city, its social outsiders and marginal groups.

Markus Selg, one of the pioneers of computer-generated painting, is represented in this exhibition with Rendezvous (Ersatz) from the year 2000, a large-format work on paper depicting the meeting of two mutant-like creatures against a dark background. While these two figures and their backdrop might seem fantastical and unreal at first glance, the representation is quite consciously exaggerated and can just as easily be read as an event from the nightlife of the city.

Thomas Zipp’s STURM at Lake Placidis one of a series of works made at various locations at the turn of the millennium: his so-called ‘dirt paintings’. For this series Zipp decided to let life participate in the painting process, carrying his canvases around with him everywhere and allowing them to come into contact with all the environmental and other influences to which he himself was exposed, before finishing them as paintings by deliberately selecting specific sections and applying precise, often minimal supplementary marks.

These works from the turn of the millennium are indicative examples of important, pioneering phases in the creative work of their respective artists. They also attest to a particularly innovative and productive moment in Berlin’s recent art history. But this exhibition is more than just an invitation to review and retrospection. It also provides an opportunity to consider the art of the late nineties and early noughties in terms of its relevance to contemporary art, and to take a comparative look at the artistic centre of Berlin then and now.

Die Zeit der Jahrtausendwende war vielerorts in der Welt eine Zeit der Aufbruchsstimmung. Nicht so in Berlin. Hier wurden etwaige Erwartungen an das Millennium von einer allgemeinen Katerstimmung nach der Euphorie des Mauerfalls sowie von der aktuellen Misere der Stadt überlagert. Die Verschuldung befand sich auf Rekordniveau, die Wirtschaft lahmte und das Vertrauen in die Politik ging skandalbedingt gegen Null. Von positiven Zukunftsaussichten keine Spur.

Neben der bereits international gefeierten Berliner Clubszene war es allein der Kulturbetrieb der Stadt, der in dieser Situation noch florierte, insbesondere die schon seit Mitte der Neunziger Jahre im steten Aufwind sich befindende Kunstszene. Verantwortlich dafür waren einerseits die Künstler, die ausgesprochen zahlreich und von überall her in die offene, freiheitbietende Stadt kamen, und andererseits die Galerien, die sich in stetig wachsender Zahl vor allem im Bezirk Mitte ansiedelten und viele der in Berlin ansässigen Künstler in ihr Programm aufnahmen. Gemeinsam sorgten Künstler und Galerien dafür, dass Berlin in der Zeit der Jahrtausendwende nicht nur seine einstmalige Stellung als die deutsche Kunstmetropole zurückgewann, sondern sich gleichzeitig anschickte, zum zeitweilig angesagtesten Hotspot für zeitgenössische Kunst weltweit zu avancieren.

Die Ausstellung versammelt Werke von acht Künstlern, die an dieser Entwicklung Anteil hatten und gleichzeitig die Programmatik der Galerie Guido W. Baudach entscheidend prägten – André Butzer, Björn Dahlem, Thilo Heinzmann, Thomas Helbig, Andy Hope 1930, Erwin Kneihsl, Markus Selg und Thomas Zipp. Sie alle kamen Mitte, Ende der Neunziger Jahre an die Spree und bereicherten die Kunstszene der Stadt mit dem Wissen und den verschiedenen Einflüssen, die sie von andernorts mitbrachten, sowie mit ihrem innovativen Geist, der gerade im Berlin jener Tage auf ausgesprochen fruchtbaren Boden fiel. Thomas Helbig und Andy Hope 1930 hatten zuvor in München und London studiert und dort beide dem losen Künstlerkollektiv Deutsch-Britische Freundschaft angehört, welches eine Reihe vielbeachteter Ausstellungen organisierte. Thilo Heinzmann und Thomas Zipp kamen als ehemalige Studenten der Frankfurter Städelschule nach Berlin und teilten mit ihrem früheren Lehrer Thomas Bayerle das Interesse an einer zeitgemäßen Fortentwicklung der Malerei. André Butzer und Markus Selg, beide ehedem Mitbegründer der schon damals legendären Akademie Isotrop, einem freien, unabhängigen Verbund von Künstlern unterschiedlichster Disziplinen mit autonomem Lehrprogramm, siedelten 1999, als die Akademie Isotrop nach fünf hochproduktiven Jahren zerfiel, aus Hamburg nach Berlin über. Zur selben Zeit kamen auch Björn Dahlem und Erwin Kneihsl nach Berlin, der eine als junger Absolvent der Düsseldorfer Kunstakademie und ehemaliges Mitglied der Künstlergruppe HobbyPop, der andere als fast zwanzig Jahre älterer Rückkehrer aus Wien, wo er an der Graphischen Lehr- und Versuchsanstalt Fotografie studiert hatte, ehe er Mitte der Siebziger erstmals als Künstler nach Berlin gezogen war.

Die ausgestellten Fotografien, Collagen, Zeichnungen, Malereien und Skulpturen stammen aus den Jahren 1999 bis 2001. Sie belegen die formale wie inhaltliche Bandbreite der künstlerischen Produktion im Berlin jener Zeit. Sie zeigen aber auch, wie nachdrücklich Künstler im Berlin der Jahrtausendwende in bewusster Auseinandersetzung mit der kunsthistorischen Tradition und jenseits aller Anbiederung an die vorherrschenden Trends der Zeit die Möglichkeiten neuer Ausdrucks- und Gestaltungsformen im Kontext der zeitgenössischen Kunst ausloteten.

So trat André Butzer beispielsweise an, um mittels seiner Malerei einen eigenen Kosmos zu entwerfen. Die Ausstellung zeigt das Gemälde Friedens-Siemens IV, eines der ersten in Berlin entstandenen Bilder der gleichnamigen Serie. Mit diesen Porträts einer freundlichen Spezies von körperlosen Kopffüsslern, hauptsächlich in schwarz-weiss gehalten, leitete Butzer im Jahr 2000 den Übergang in eine neue Werkphase ein. In der Folge wurden die Friedens-Siemense zum zentralen Personal seines Science-Fiction-Expressionismus der Nuller Jahre und bevölkerten gemeinsam mit anderen comichaften Wesen die utopische Welt von Nasaheim.

Björn Dahlems bildhauerisches Schaffen machte sich zur selben Zeit ebenfalls den Himmel zum Thema. Die Installation Schwarzes Loch (M-Sphären) ist formal wie inhaltlich als frühes „signature piece“ des Künstlers zu werten. Ursprünglich in der Kunsthalle St. Gallen ausgestellt und im Sommer 2003 bei einem Brand im Museum Hamburger Bahnhof zerstört, hat Dahlem diese erste seiner raumgreifenden Ins-Bild-Setzungen der dunklen Riesen des Weltalls eigens für die Ausstellung rekonstruiert.

Auch Thilo Heinzmanns O. T. aus dem Jahr 1999 steht stellvertretend für einen damals neuen Werkkomplex des Künstlers. Denn erst im Jahr zuvor hatte Thilo Heinzmann in seinem Streben nach einer Erneuerung der Malerei das Styropor als Malgrund für sich entdeckt und begonnen, diesen mit monochromen Kompositionen in rot oder schwarz pigmentiertem Epoxidharz zu bearbeiten, teils per Dripping, teils per Walzentechnik.

Thomas Helbigs Gemälde Ikone von 2001 wiederum verbindet in seiner Zeichenhaftigkeit bei gleichzeitigem Detailreichtum in geradezu prototypischer Weise europäische Volkskunst und frühe Avantgarde, also jene beiden Einflüsse, auf die Helbig in seiner vielfältigen künstlerischen Praxis bis heute immer wieder Bezug nimmt und deren ursprüngliche Verknüpfung ihn beständig umtreibt.

In den zwischen Malerei, Zeichnung und Collage changierenden Arbeiten, die Andy Hope 1930 zur Jahrtausendwende als Neuankömmling in Berlin herstellt und von denen die bislang nie gezeigten Machiavelli Transfer und The Trees are... aus dem Jahr 2000 in der Ausstellung zu sehen sind, trifft man dagegen auf die für den Künstler auch in der Folgezeit so typische Anverwandlung von Superhelden-Comics, Fantasy-, Splatter- und Sci-Fi-Geschichten sowie auf deren gleichzeitige Kontextualisierung im Feld der zeitgenössischen Kunst.

Erwin Kneihsls 1999 erstelltes monumentales Künstlerbuch Alexanderplatz, welches im Zentrum der Ausstellung steht, liefert mit seinen zahlreichen, teils in mehreren Schichten übereinandermontierten schwarz-weiß Fotografien eine ebenso ungeschönte wie gleichwohl künstlerisch stilisierte Dokumentation des Alltags an Berlins urbanstem Ort zur Zeit die Jahrtausendwende, die ähnlich wie siebzig Jahre zuvor Alfred Döblins gleichnamiger Epochenroman der Stadt und deren gesellschaftlichen Außenseitern und Randgruppen ein Denkmal setzt.

Markus Selg, einer der Pioniere der computergenerierten Malerei, ist in der Ausstellung mit der großformartigen Papierarbeit Rendezvous (Ersatz) aus dem Jahr 2000 vertreten, in welcher die Begegnung zweier mutantenähnlicher Wesen vor dunklem Hintergrund zu sehen ist. So fantastisch und irreal die beiden Figuren und die gesamte Szenerie auf den ersten Blick wirken mögen, so leicht lässt sich bei der ganz bewusst auf Überzeichnung angelegten Darstellung auch an eine Begebenheit aus dem urbanen Nachtleben denken.

STURM at Lake Placid von Thomas Zipp zählt zu einer um die Jahrtausendwende an verschiedenen Orten entstandenen Gemäldeserie des Künstlers, den sog. Dirt-Bildern, mit denen Zipp dem Ansatz folgte, das Leben selbst am Malprozess teilhaben zu lassen, indem er seine Leinwände überall mit sich herumtrug und sie mit allen Umwelt- und sonstigen Einflüssen in Kontakt treten ließ, denen er auch sich selbst ausgesetzt sah, bevor er sie durch eine gezielte Wahl des Bildausschnitts und sehr präzise, oftmals nur minimale zusätzliche Setzungen als Malereien fertigstellte.

Die ausgestellten Werke aus der Zeit der Jahrtausendwende sind beispielhafte Zeugnisse sowohl für wichtige, zukunftsweisende Schaffensphasen der jeweiligen Künstler als auch für einen besonders innovativen und produktiven Moment der jüngeren Berliner Kunstgeschichte. Die Ausstellung soll allerdings nicht allein zur Wiederbegegnung und Rückschau einladen. Sie bietet auch die Möglichkeit, Kunst der späten Neunziger und frühen Nuller Jahre auf ihre Relevanz im gegenwärtigen Kunstkontext hin zu untersuchen sowie die ein oder andere vergleichende Betrachtung zum Kunststandort Berlin damals und heute anzustellen.