Manifestations Björn Dahlem, Thomas Helbig, Andy Hope 1930, Erik van Lieshout, Philipp Modersohn, Aida Ruilova, Yves Scherer, Markus Selg, Thomas Zipp

17 November–22 December 2018
Manifestations
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
7 Things of Mollino (A), 2006
Aïda Ruilova

Video, colour, sound, 48 sec

Andy Hope 1930

DEAD MAD DEAD, 1997-2007
Card box, gold paper, application
60.5 x 32 x 41 cm

Force Table, 2018
Thomas Zipp

Mixed media
198 x 89 x 94 cm

Manifestations
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Manifestations
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Archaic Revival Series: Dream Stele (Thutmose IV) fractal simulation, 2018
Markus Selg

UV-print on cellulose Polyester and aluminium dibond
188 x 40 x 40 cm

Baubi3, 2018
Philipp Modersohn

Rollers, pebble stones, Asilikos, epoxy resin, steel, sand
162 x 90 x 90 cm

Manifestations
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Vincent, 2018
Yves Scherer

Paint on aluminium
182 x 102 x 45 cm

Quattrocento, 2011
Thomas Helbig

Mixed media
127 x 45 x 45 cm

Manifestations
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Manifestations
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Manifestations
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Superstruktur (Melancholia), 2018
Björn Dahlem

Wood, isolation foam, LED light, glass vase, glass bowl, flask, pool ball, jaegermeister, coke
220 x 150 x 180 cm

Sony HD, 2009
Erik van Lieshout

Card box, wood, vinyl
134 x 84 x 84 cm

Galerie Guido W. Baudach is pleased to present the group show Manifestations. On the basis of selected works by different artists of the gallery the show demonstrates complex aspects of contemporary sculpture which are put up for discussion.

Sculptures are – first of all – three-dimensional objects made by human hands with ideational intention. Corresponding artifacts from the Neolithic period are the oldest known artworks. Through all periods, sculpture represents one of the most central artistic disciplines. In the early 20th Century sculpture was expanded by a completely new branch: the Readymade, which is not shaped or made by the artist himself but is introduced into the context of art as a found object. Since then, artists use found objects, so-called objets trouvés, naturally as sculpting material.

This, for example, is the case in the work of the painter and sculptor Thomas Helbig. His assemblage called Quattrocento from 2011 builds a bridge to the European Renaissance – an epoch which devoted itself explicitly to the study of the human body. Helbig´s sculpture clearly reveals feminine features. The headless torso of a dummy is glued to a wooden log to form a hybrid figure. Eventually, an all-over painting with deep brown lacquer provides the sculpture with its unifying appearance.

A synthesis of different components also characterizes the contribution of multimedia specialist Markus Selg, who also is a protagonist of digital art. Where Helbig‘s sculpture appears as dark and dystopian, Selg´s Dream Stele (Thutmose IV) encounters the viewer in bright CMYK colors. Specifically, one recognizes elements of the ancient past (the face of the mummy of an Egyptian king) as well as picture patterns of the computer age. The figure and the pedestal show motifs that are either found objects or graphic structures – the latter were created using a fractal algorithm. Subsequently, the interconnected patterns and image quotations were applied on a synthetic substance as thermoplastic prints. In a further step, the artist transferred the material from the second to the third dimension by hand.

The painter, sculptor and installation artist Thomas Zipp also intersperses materials which inspire various connotations. His sculpture Force Table demonstrates elements of basic stereometric forms as well as wooden extremities of dummies. Associations with Russian Constructivism are combined with the puppet metamorphoses of the Surrealists. In addition, through wiring, electricity and light bulbs, the sculpture acquires aspects of a light-giving or a kinetic human machine.

In contrast to the collaged figurations by Zipp, Selg and Helbig, the Swiss artist Yves Scherer presents an almost classical sculptural work. Indeed, Vincent – a pink-lacquered, life-size male nude cast from aluminum – is the 3D realization of a still image from the film Irréversible (2002), showing the actor Vincent Cassel. His appearance, casually emerging from the bath, is a reminiscence of a modern David and refers to the excesses of violence, in which the figure is involved in the film, in its subtext only.

Subliminally disconcerting and disturbing are the videos by US-American artist Aïda Ruilova, in which emotional and psychological states are transported. In her barely minute-long video 7 Things of Mollino from 2006, a hand held into the camera presents obscure objects that are seemingly incoherent in the darkened interior. The work was created in the enchanted villa of the Italian universal talent and eccentric Carlo Mollino (1905-1973) in Turin. The screening of mostly sculptural objects – from castings of antique spolia to curiosities from the Wunderkammer – draws a psychogram of their former owner.

What seems to be more transparent is the Superstruktur (Melancholia) titled work by sculptor Björn Dahlem, a wafting web made out of thin wooden strips standing on the ground, in which among other materials an LED cable is incorporated. The illuminated cosmic web leans or balances on a white polyhedron, a Platonic ideal form, which was already used symbolically in Albrecht Dürer‘s engraving Melencolia I. The polyhedron appears as a mysterious building block or as the base of an elusive world design. Placed slightly apart, a glass calyx made of found objects also belongs to the sculpture. Its content, a dark elixir, apparently points towards the black bile – a fluid assigned to melancholy in the context of the ancient conception of the four temperaments. In this mood, the poets of Romanticism saw the basis of all creative activity and of all artistic practice.

Implied future scenarios combined with historical material can also be found on DEAD MAD DEAD (1997-2007) by Andy Hope 1930. A cardboaord box is covered with gold foil, on which the artist has applied collaged compositions of different elements: enigmatic emblems, numbers and slogans, female and male superheroes from comic strips as well as the medieval-looking illustration of a hawk hunt. The shimmering object with its peculiarly low base and auratizing plexiglass hood acts like a shrine, a shrine of trash, to whose closer consideration one literally must go down on his knees.

 

Baubi3, a three-stage, rejuvenating sculpture by Philipp Modersohn bears witness to a completely different materiality. The work is made of sediments such as pebbles and sand but lacks the corresponding ephemeral, fragile appearance. Formally, one might be reminded of an abstract sculpture of the early 20th Century. But this historical perspective should not obscure what this scrolling contemporary work of art is too: a sculpted, mobile pile of sand in the age of the Anthropocene.

In contrast to these nature and landscape references, the sculpture Sony HD by the Dutchman Erik van Lieshout from the year 2009 illustrates a technical device, a video camera, that however is made of cardboard and self-adhesive-film. In this way, the artist portrays his primary means of work, because the films recorded with his video camera always act as starting points for van Lieshout‘s further elaboration of a topic in the form of drawings, paintings and/or installations. In this process, colored self-adhesive-film is used again and again as a creative element. As a result, Lieshout‘s camera sculpture as a three-dimensional image not only reminds of the stylistic history of Modernism i.e. Minimal Art. Furthermore, it touches fundamental subjects with aspects such as likeness and illustration, perspective, image depth and illusionism, which go back far into the history of art.

 

Thomas Groetz

                                                                                                                                   

Die Galerie Guido W. Baudach freut sich, unter dem Titel Manifestations eine Gruppenausstellung zu präsentieren, die anhand ausgewählter Arbeiten von verschiedenen Künstlern der Galerie vielschichtige Aspekte der zeitgenössischen Skulptur aufzeigt und zur Diskussion stellt.

Skulpturen sind – zunächst einmal - von Menschenhand in ideeler Absicht hergestellte dreidimensionale Objekte. Entsprechende Artefakte aus dem Neolithikum sind die ältesten uns bekannten Kunstwerke überhaupt. Durch alle Epochen hindurch stellt die Bildhauerei eine der zentralen künstlerischen Disziplinen dar. Im frühen 20. Jahrhundert wurde diese durch das Readymade, welches nicht vom Künstler selbst geformt oder hergestellt ist, sondern als Fundstück in die Kunst eingeführt wird, um eine völlig neue Sparte erweitert. Seither verwenden Künstler vorgefundene Gegenstände, sogenannte Objets trouvés, ganz selbstverständlich als Material der plastischen Gestaltung.

 

Dies ist zum Beispiel bei den Arbeiten des Malers und Bildhauers Thomas Helbig der Fall. Quattrocento nennt sich seine, 2011 entstandene Assemblage, deren Titel eine Brücke zur europäischen Renaissance schlägt – einer Epoche, die sich explizit der Beschäftigung mit dem menschlichen Körper widmete. Helbigs Skulptur offenbart deutlich weibliche Züge. Der kopflose Torso einer Schaufensterpuppe ist mit einem Holzstamm zu einer hybriden Figur verklebt, die erst aufgrund ihrer durchgängigen Bemalung mit tiefbraunem Lack vereinheitlicht wirkt.

Eine Synthese unterschiedlicher Bestandteile kennzeichnet auch den Beitrag des im Bereich der digitalen Kunst bekannten Multimedialisten Markus Selg. Wo Helbigs Plastik dunkel und dystopisch erscheint, tritt Selgs Dream Stele (Thutmose IV) dem Betrachter in leuchtenden CMYK-Farben entgegen. Konkret erkennt man Elemente der antiken Vergangenheit (das Antlitz der Mumie eines ägyptischen Königs) sowie Bildmuster des Computer-Zeitalters. Figur und Sockel zeigen Motive, die entweder Fundstücke oder grafische Strukturen sind; letztere entstanden unter Anwendung eines fraktalen Algorithmus. Anschließend wurden die miteinander verbundenen Muster und Bildzitate thermoplastisch auf Kunststoffflächen gedruckt und in einem weiteren Arbeitsschritt vom Künstler per Hand von der zweiten in die dritte Dimension überführt.

Auch der Maler, Bildhauer und Installationskünstler Thomas Zipp verklammert unterschiedlich konnotierbare Materialien. Seine Skulptur Force Table veranschaulicht Elemente aus basalen stereometrischen Grundformen sowie hölzerne Extremitäten von Gliederpuppen. Assoziationen zum Russischen Konstruktivismus verbinden sich mit den Puppen-Metamorphosen der Surrealisten. Darüber hinaus erhält die Skulptur durch Verkabelung, Elektrizität und Glühbirnen Aspekte eines Lichtbringers bzw. einer kinetischen Mensch-Maschine.

Im Kontrast zu den collagierten Figurationen von Zipp, Selg und Helbig präsentiert der Schweizer Künstler Yves Scherer eine geradezu klassisch erscheinende Bildhauerarbeit. Dabei ist Vincent, ein mit rosafarbenem Lack überzogener, lebensgroßer männlicher Akt aus gegossenem Aluminium, die 3D-Realisation eines Standbildes des Schauspielers Vincent Cassel aus dem Film Irréversible (2002). Die lässig dem Bad entstiegene, an einen modernen David erinnernde Erscheinung verweist nur mehr im Subtext auf die Gewaltexzesse, in welche die Figur im Film verwickelt ist.

Unterschwellig beunruhigend und verstörend sind auch die Videos der US-amerikanischen Künstlerin Aïda Ruilova, in denen emotionale und psychische Zustände transportiert werden. In ihrem nur knapp einminütigem Video 7 Things of Mollino aus dem Jahr 2006 präsentiert eine in die Kamera gehaltene Hand in abgedunkeltem Interieur scheinbar zusammenhangslos obskure Gegenstände. Die Arbeit entstand in der verwunschenen Villa des italienischen Universaltalents und Exzentrikers Carlo Mollino (1905-1973) in Turin. Die filmische Vorführung meist skulpturaler Objekte – von Abgüssen antiker Spolien über Kuriositäten aus der Wunderkammer – zeichnet gleichsam ein Psychogramm ihres einstigen Besitzers.

Transparent erscheint die Superstruktur (Melancholia) betitelte Skulptur des Bildhauers Björn Dahlem, ein auf dem Boden stehendes waberndes Geflecht aus dünnen Holzleisten, in das neben anderen Materialien ein LED-Kabel eingearbeitet ist. Das durchleuchtete kosmische Netz lehnt oder balanciert auf einem weißen Polyeder, einer platonischen Idealform, die schon in Albrecht Dürers Kupferstich Melencolia I symbolische Verwendung fand. Der Polyeder wirkt als rätselhafter Baustein bzw. als Sockel eines kaum fassbaren Weltentwurfs. Ein etwas abseits stehender, aber ebenso zur Arbeit gehörender, aus Fundstücken hergestellter Glaskelch verweist mit seinem Inhalt, einem dunklen Elixier, offenbar auf die schwarze Galle – eine Flüssigkeit, die im Kontext der antiken Lehre von den vier Temperamenten der Melancholie zugewiesen ist, jener Gemütslage, in der nicht zuletzt die Dichter der Romantik den Urgrund allen schöpferischen Tuns, aller künstlerischen Praxis sahen.

 

Angedeutete Zukunftsszenarien im Verbund mit historischem Material finden sich auch auf DEAD MAD DEAD (1997-2007) von Andy Hope 1930, einem mit Goldfolie beklebten Karton, auf dessen sichtbaren Seitenflächen der Künstler collagierte Kompositionen aus unterschiedlichen Elementen aufgebracht hat: verrätselte Embleme, Zahlen und Slogans, Comic-Superheldinnen und -helden sowie die mittelalterlich anmutende Illustration einer Falkenjagd. Das schillernde Objekt mit dem eigentümlich niedrigen Sockel und der auratisierenden Plexiglashaube wirkt wie ein Schrein, ein Schrein des Trash, zu dessen genauerer Betrachtung man buchstäblich in die Knie gehen muss.

Von einer ganz anderen Materialität zeugt Baubi3 von Philipp Modersohn, eine sich dreistufig verjüngende Skulptur, die aus Sedimenten wie Kieselsteinen und Sand gefertigt ist, aber gleichwohl nicht die zu erwartende ephemere, zerbrechliche Anmutung besitzt. Formal könnte man sich an eine abstrakte Plastik des frühen 20. Jahrhundert erinnert fühlen, doch diese historische Perspektive sollte nicht den Blick darauf verstellen, was dieses mit Rollen ausgestattete zeitgenössische Kunstwerk auch ist: ein in Form gebrachter, mobiler Sandhaufen im Zeitalter des Anthropozän.

Im Kontrast zu diesen Natur- und Landschaftsbezügen veranschaulicht die Skulptur Sony HD des Niederländers Erik van Lieshout aus dem Jahr 2009 ein technisches Gerät, eine Video-Kamera, die allerdings aus Karton und Selbstklebefolie gefertigt ist. Der Künstler porträtiert auf diese Weise sein primäres Arbeitsutensil, denn die mit seiner Videokamera aufgenommenen Filme fungieren bei van Lieshout stets als Ausgangspunkt für die weiterführende Ausarbeitung des jeweiligen Themas in Form von Zeichnungen, Malereien und/oder Installationen. Farbige Klebefolie kommt dabei immer wieder als Gestaltungsmittel zum Einsatz. Somit erinnert Lieshouts Kamera-Skulptur als dreidimensionales Bild nicht nur an Stilformen der Moderne, wie etwa die Minimal Art, sondern berührt mit Aspekten wie Abbild(ung), Perspektive, Bildtiefe und Illusionismus grundsätzliche Topoi, die weit in die Kunstgeschichte zurückreichen.

 

Thomas Groetz