M E T A M O R P H O S I S curated by Zdenek Felix Habima Fuchs, Thomas Helbig, Renaud Jerez, Kris Lemsalu and Mary-Audrey Ramirez

11 March–15 April 2017
M E T A M O R P H O S I S , 2017
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Untitled, 2015
Renaud Jerez

Steel, PVC, aluminium, cotton, rubber, wood and fur
195 x 75 x 75 cm

AA5, 2015
Renaud Jerez

Foam and fabric
Dimensions variable

Die Sehnsucht nach Exzess, 2016
Thomas Helbig

Mixed media
176 x 47 x 47 cm

Marquise, 2016
Thomas Helbig

Mixed media
90 x 53 x 45 cm

Car2Go, 2016
Kris Lemsalu

Metal, glass, plastic, brick, ceramic and fabric
Dimensions variable

M E T A M O R P H O S I S , 2017
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Transformations (Wild Abundance), 2012
Habima Fuchs

Ceramic
57 x 80 x 35 cm

Photo: Tomas Soucek

M E T A M O R P H O S I S , 2017
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Eyes horizontal, nose vertical (foster your eminent dance) / Sprouting I, 2016
Habima Fuchs

Ceramic
13 x 28 x 18 cm

Eyes horizontal, nose vertical (foster your eminent dance) / Feet and Halo, 2016
Habima Fuchs

Ceramic, dry rot
8 x 15 x 15 cm

Eyes horizontal, nose vertical (foster your eminent dance) / Sprouting II, 2016
Habima Fuchs

Ceramic
9 x 17 x 20 cm

M E T A M O R P H O S I S , 2017
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Schwarze Putte, 2016
Thomas Helbig

Mixed media
50 x 40 x 33 cm

Immaterial Material Love, 2017
Kris Lemsalu

Ceramic
Ø 47 cm, depth 21 cm

Gummitwist, enjoying lesbian company, 2016
Mary-Audrey Ramirez

Mixed media
Nora (Mantis 1): 140 x 97 x 50 cm
Nono (Mantis 2): 103 x 82 x 100 cm
Rope: 180 cm

M E T A M O R P H O S I S , 2017
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Hula Doggo, 2017
Mary-Audrey Ramirez

Mixed media
Dimensions variable

M E T A M O R P H O S I S , 2017
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
M E T A M O R P H O S I S , 2017
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach

Participating institutions:
KAI 10 | Arthena Foundation, Dusseldorf (4 March – 27 May 2017)
Galerie Guido W. Baudach, Berlin (10 March – 15 April 2017)
SVIT, Prague (5 June – 9 July 2017)

The term „metamorphosis“ comes from ancient Greek and means transformation, mutation, transfiguration. In the field of biology, it describes the controversial, multi-stage development of certain living beings such as frogs or butterflies, developing from a larva to a fully-formed creature. In the process of transformation, the initial gestalt morphs into a completely new identity.

In his long narrative poem Metamorphoses, completed around the year 8 AD, Roman poet Ovid tells of the transformations of gods, heroes, humans, plants and animals. Ovid’s guiding theme is the idea of an essential transition from one state to another; his poetry transforms ancient myths into epic scenes, such as that of the nymph Daphne transforming into a laurel tree in order to escape the god Apollo, who was aggressively pursuing her. Ovid sees the human existence as determined by the consequence of mutual, interdependent entanglements between all living creatures and the gods – a poetic fiction of an all-encompassing cosmic order.

The term „metamorphosis“ was reborn in the context of Surrealism. In keeping with the Comte de Lautréamont’s famous musings on how “the chance encounter of a sewing machine and an umbrella on an operating table” can stir up unexpected affect and visions in the viewer, the Surrealists wanted to destroy the usual interrelations through juxtaposing things that are alien to each other’s nature in order to free our unconscious and hitherto unknown levels of imagination. The purpose of the resulting images, suddenly laden with new unexpected contents, was to counter and subvert the seemingly logical structures of the usual ways of „seeing“ and to offer a surreal, clairvoyant mode of perception instead.

In his Second Surrealist Manifesto, written in 1930, André Breton declared: „May the devil keep the surrealist project from ever wanting to forego metamorphoses.“

The artists in the group exhibition Metamorphosis are not really concerned with the relations between the mythical and the secular nor with the surrealistic irreconcilability between consciousness and the unconscious. In their works however each of them deals in their own individual way with transformations of forms, materials, bodies, ideas and substances. The focus of the exhibition’s curation lies on the three-dimensional works by the participating artists, which highlights the specific role of transfiguration as a creative principle in each individual work. The selection comprises five contemporary positions from five European countries.

Habima Fuchs (born 1977 in Ostrov) is a Czech artist working in sculpture drawing and ceramics, film and installations. She lives between the Czech Republic, Germany, France and Italy, basically leading the life of a cultural nomad. Her work is inspired by myths and legends of different origins and is mainly concerned with their spiritual content. Her „futurologists“ take the position of meditating Buddhas. In the ceramic sculpture Pratyupanna (2014), exhibited at Baudach Gallery, a large snake with tentacles morphs into a menacing creature that resembles a sea anemone. Ultimately the snake’s body transforms into 84 individual parts. This multiplied body, the artist says, allows for a „better and more complex perception“ of the environment. In Transformations / Wild Abundance (2012), a crouching female figure undergoes a more „human“ metamorphosis: with her masklike face, carrying her over-dimensional sex like both a spear and shield, she is the „baubo“, both a fertility idol and a demon all at once.

The German artist Thomas Helbig (born 1967 in Rosenheim) works in painting, drawing and sculpture. His early works make use of the formal potential of modernity, playing with its vocabulary of forms while simultaneously deconstructing it. The collaged sculptures he has been creating in recent years display a different kind of transformation of the materials. He picks discarded, discarded commodities from the waste of civilisation as well as from the shelves of department stores that sell kitschy sculptures, vases or plastic toys, and uses them for his art. Helbig takes them apart, cutting open the mostly hollow forms and welds the fragments into new objects that he then paints. Recognisable elements such as hands, heads, breasts, or feet appear alongside fragments of anonymous figures, toys and masks, producing assemblages bearing a strong symbolic resonance. While their features vaguely testify to their past, they obscure it and point to new connections. References to Star Wars as well as those to the formal vocabulary of South German Baroque, which Helbig is connected to by virtue of his biography, abound in his work, giving rise to an impression that his latest sculptures emphasise through their use of colourful textiles such as red velvet. But it is not a feeling of religiosity that these sculptures evoke, rather, it is a kind of absurd humour reminiscent of Giorgio de Chirico’s „metaphysical landscapes”.

French artist Renaud Jerez (born 1982 in Narbonne), who lives in Paris and Basel, has made a name for himself creating disturbing installations and assemblages made of metal, wire, lead pipes, insulated cables and other industrial materials. Although he does indeed reflect on the „virtual realities“ of the internet, his sculptures primarily focus on matter that can be perceived by the senses and intend to reveal their structures. His main concern, he says, is „bodies contaminated by consumerism“, at the root of which lies the production and consumption of video games, science fiction films and computer-generated avatars. Jerez find the inspiration for his works in everything that is unleashed en masse by virtual imagination. He works in stark contrasts, creating the „cyborgs“ of these virtual worlds out of civilisational residues and rubbish, while revealing the biological infrastructure of human bodies qua machines, that, virtuality notwithstanding, still operate as interfaces between humans and the world. In their metamorphosis from one state to the other, Jerez‘s androids and robots point to their biological past, but also reveal a dystopian model of an inverted evolution, in which man-made commodities become emancipated and transform into a strange anti-world.

The Estonian artist Kris Lemsalu (born 1985 in Tallinn) is a ceramist and primarily works with media installation and performance. In a performance she staged at Frieze New York 2015, she spent several hours lying on her stomach under a huge ceramic turtle shell, with only her naked feet, hands and a shock of hair visible – a manifesto of solitude, isolation and repression of the individual in today‘s society, and especially the commercial art word. The sculpture exhibited at Galerie Baudach, titled Car2Go (2016), is a complex installation that comprises several parts. At first you read it as a kind of “angel“ figure, its metal wings made out of the two side doors of a car. Its „body“ is covered with a blue bedspread and in its upper middle section are two wolf heads made of ceramic, beneath which are two shapely nude female breasts held by two hands – a contrast that evokes religious as well as existential connotations. Nearby, small figures holding yellow umbrellas in the area are an indirect reference to the pro-democracy “Umbrella Movement“ in Hong Kong. A funeral procession in Sri Lanka that Kris Lemsalu witnessed in her travels also echoes in the installation. When Car2Go was first exhibited, the artist developed a performance around it, hugging the angel figure tightly and letting herself slowly slide down to its feet, in what would be a nod to a tragic gesture, reminiscent of Mary at the feet of Jesus on the cross, or a commentary on the current political situation.

Mary-Audrey Ramirez (born 1990 in Luxembourg), hailing from Luxembourg and  living in Germany, studied multimedia at the University of Fine Arts in Berlin. Sculptural works and installations are the focus of her interest. For her earlier two-dimensional images she had developed a special technique, using a sewing machine to create lines that formed structures, on canvas or burlap. The lines grow spontaneously at first, and gradually transform into legible arrangements and scenes as the sewing progressed. They form enigmatic scenes populated by humans and animals, merging into one another and shifting identities in metamorphic encounters. Life, empathy and sexuality encounter violence and death, animals attack and devour one another, but these gloomy scenarios are playfully disrupted and transformed into fairy tales. The sculptural works she has been creating since 2013 are for the most part concerned with the transitions between human and animal form. In her research, Mary-Audrey Ramirez discovered the (still vital) world of various folkloric traditions in different parts of Europe, especially the masks and costumes worn in rural carnival rituals and on Shrove Tuesday that aid the transformation of people into animals, plants and wild spirits. This inspiration is referenced in some of her performances and sculptural works. Ramirez conjures up a diverse cast of large and small animals to populate her universe – flamingos, pelicans, pot-bellied pigs, tapirs, skates and foxes, who take on ambiguous roles in a kind of phantasmagoric Alice in Horrorland. They engage in human behavior, but remain in their own animal world, which is ultimately why they end up having the upper hand over humans.

Zdenek Felix, February 2017

 

 

Teilnehmende Institutionen:
KAI 10 | Arthena Foundation, Düsseldorf (4. März – 27. Mai 2017)
Galerie Guido W. Baudach, Berlin (10. März – 15. April 2017)
SVIT, Prag (5. Juni – 9. Juli 2017)

Der Begriff „Metamorphosis“ stammt aus dem Altgriechischen und bedeutet in etwa Verwandlung, Veränderung, Umgestaltung. Im Bereich der Biologie bezeichnet er die kontroverse, mehrere Stadien umfassende Entwicklung bestimmter Lebewesen, wie z.B. von Fröschen oder Schmetterlingen, von der Larve zum finalen Tier. Im Prozess der Verwandlung erhält die anfängliche Gestalt eine völlig neue Identität.

In der um das Jahr 8.n.Ch. verfassten gleichnamigen Dichtung des römischen Autors Ovid werden Geschichten von den Verwandlungen der Götter, Heroen, Menschen, Pflanzen und Tiere erzählt. Zum Leitmotiv wählte Ovid die Idee des essentiellen Übergangs von einem Zustand in den anderen, wobei er antike Mythen, wie jenen von der Nymphe Daphne, die vor den Nachstellungen des Gottes Apollo fliehend sich in Lorbeer verwandelt, in epische Bilder transformiert. Die Bestimmung des menschlichen Daseins wird von Ovid als Folge gegenseitiger Verflechtungen aller Lebewesen und Göttern gesehen, eine poetische Fiktion einer allumfassenden kosmischen Ordnung.

Im Surrealismus erfährt der Begriff „Metamorphosis“ eine Wiedergeburt. Auf dem berühmten Spruch des Comte de Lautréamont basierend, wonach die Begegnung einer Nähmaschine mit dem Regenschirm auf einem Seziertisch unerwartete Emotionen und Visionen hervorruft, wollen die Surrealisten mit Konfrontationen von wesensfremden Dingen die üblichen Zusammenhänge zerstören und die unbewussten Vorstellungsebenen befreien. Die so entstehenden, plötzlichen mit neuen Inhalten aufgeladenen Bilder sollen den scheinbar logischen Strukturen des üblichen „Sehens“ eine surreale, hellseherische Wahrnehmung entgegen setzen.

„Der Teufel, sage ich, bewahre die surrealistische Idee davor, jemals ohne Metamorphosen auskommen zu wollen“, postuliert André Breton 1930 in „Second Manifeste du Surréalisme“.
 
Für die an der Ausstellung Metamorphosis teilnehmenden Künstler und Künstlerinnen spielen die Beziehungen zwischen dem Mythischen und Weltlichen wie auch die surrealistische Unversöhnlichkeit zwischen dem Bewussten und Unbewussten eine eher geringere Rolle. Sie sind jedoch auf individuelle Art und Weise in ihren Werken mit den Verwandlungen von Formen, Materialien, Körpern, Ideen und Substanzen beschäftigt. Die Regie der Ausstellung konzentriert sich auf die dreidimensionalen Werke der beteiligten Künstler, wodurch die spezifische Rolle der Verwandlung als gestalterisches Prinzip in den einzelnen Arbeiten deutlich zum Ausdruck kommt. Die Auswahl umfasst fünf zeitgenössische Positionen aus fünf europäischen Ländern.

Die tschechische Künstlerin Habima Fuchs (*1977, Ostrov) ist Bildhauerin, Zeichnerin und Keramikerin, beteiligt sich an Filmen und Installationen. Ihre Aufenthaltsorte wechseln zwischen Tschechien, Deutschland, Frankreich und Italien, eigentlich führt sie das Leben einer Kulturnomadin. Den Stoff für ihre Arbeiten entnimmt sie Mythen und Legenden unterschiedlicher Herkunft, wobei sie sich hauptsächlich mit spirituellen Inhalten beschäftigt. Ihre „Futurologisten“ nehmen die Position von meditierenden Buddhas an. In der keramischen Skulptur Pratyupanna, 2014, die in der Galerie Baudach gezeigt wird, verwandelt sich eine mächtige Schlange mit einer Anzahl von Tentakeln in ein bedrohliches Lebewesen, das an die unter Wasser domestizierten Anemonen erinnert. Aus dem festen Körper der Schlange entwickeln sich schließlich 84 Einzelteile. Der so multiplizierte Körper ermöglicht, den Worten der Künstlerin zufolge „eine bessere und komplexere Wahrnehmung“ der Umwelt. Eine eher „humane“ Metamorphose erfährt in Transformations / Wild Abundance, 2012 die kauernde weibliche Figur mit maskenhaftem Gesicht, die ihr überdimensionales Geschlecht wie Schild und Angriffswaffe zugleich vor sich her trägt. Sie ist die „Baubo“ - Fruchtbarkeitsidol und Dämon in einem.

Thomas Helbig (*1967, Rosenheim) ist ein deutscher Maler, Zeichner und Bildhauer. Zu Beginn seiner Karriere nutzte Helbig das formale Potential der Moderne, um mit deren Formvokabular zu spielen und es gleichzeitig zu dekonstruieren. Seine collagierten Skulpturen aus den letzten Jahren zeigen eine andere Art der Transformation des benutzten Materials. Dabei bedient er sich aus dem Fundus der ausrangierten, weggeworfenen Dinge, aus dem Zivilisationsmüll, wie auch aus den Regalen der Deko-Abteilungen von Warenhäusern, die kitschige Skulpturen, Vasen oder Spielzeuge aus Kunststoff feilbieten. Deren meist hohle Formen zerbricht Helbig und verschweißt die Bruchteile zu neuen Objekten, die er anschließend bemalt. Erkennbare Elemente wie Hände, Köpfe, Brüste oder Füße tauchen neben Fragmenten von anonymen Figuren, Spielzeugen und Masken auf.
Es entstehen Assemblagen von starker symbolischer Wirkung. Mit vagen Andeutungen erinnern sie an ihre eigene Vergangenheit, verunklären sie jedoch und peilen neue Zusammenhänge an. Bezüge zu Star Wars-Filmen stellen sich ebenso ein, wie jene zum Vokabular des mit Helbigs Biografie verbundenen süddeutschen Barock, eine Anmutung, die in den letzten Skulpturen durch die Verwendung von farbigen Stoffen, wie etwa rotem Samt, unterstrichen wird. Eher noch als Religiosität blitzt hier aber jener absurde Humor auf, der an die „Beunruhigenden Musen“ der „metaphysischen“ Szenerien eines Giorgio de Chirico denken lässt.

Der französische, in Paris und Basel lebende Künstler Renaud Jerez (*1982, Narbonne) hat sich in den letzten Jahren einen Namen als Autor verstörender Installationen und Assemblagen aus Metall, Draht, Bleirohren, isolierten Kabeln und anderem industriellen Material gemacht. Obwohl er die „virtuellen Realitäten“ des Internets durchaus reflektiert, verlässt er sich in seinen Skulpturen hauptsächlich auf die sinnlich greifbaren Dinge, mit der Absicht, diese in ihren Strukturen zu enthüllen.
Es geht ihm, mit seinen eigenen Worten, um „bodies contaminated by consumerism“, zu dessen Quellen die Produktion und der Konsum von Video-Spielen, Science-Fiction-Filmen und computergenerierten Avataren gehören. In all dem, was die virtuelle Phantasie in Massen frei setzt, entdeckt Jerez den Stoff für seine Werke. Er arbeitet mit Gegensätzen: einerseits schafft er aus dem zivilisatorischen Schrott und Abfall die „Cyborgs“ der virtuellen Welten, andererseits enthüllt er die biologische Infrastruktur des menschlichen Körpers als Maschine, die der Virtualität zum Trotz immer noch als Träger der Kommunikation zwischen Mensch und Welt funktioniert. Im Zuge der Metamorphose von einem Zustand in den anderen weisen Jerez‘ Androiden und Roboter auf ihre biologische Vergangenheit hin, entwerfen jedoch auch ein dystopisches Modell einer verkehrten Evolution, in der sich die Erzeugnisse des Menschen verselbständigen und in eine fremdartige Anti-Welt verwandeln.

Die estnische Künstlerin Kris Lemsalu (*1985, Tallinn) ist Keramikerin und arbeitet bevorzugt mit den Medien Installation und Performance. Anlässlich der Frieze in New York 2015 verharrte sie mehrere Stunden lang auf dem Bauch liegend unter einem riesigen keramischen Schildkrötenpanzer. Zu sehen waren nur ihre nackten Füße, Hände und ein Haarschopf, ein Manifest der Einsamkeit, Isolation und Verdrängung des Individuums innerhalb der heutigen Gesellschaft und speziell des Kunstbetriebes. Die in der Galerie Baudach gezeigte Skulptur Car2Go, 2016 ist eine komplexe Installation aus mehreren Teilen. Zunächst sieht man einen „Engel“, dessen Flügel aus den beiden Seitentüren eines Autos bestehen. Sein mit einer blauen Bettdecke verhüllter „Körper“ lässt in der Mitte den Blick frei auf zwei keramische Wolfsköpfe und darunter prangende, entblößte Frauenbrüste, die von zwei Händen gehalten werden; ein Gegensatz, der religiöse wie auch existentielle Konnotationen evoziert. Kleine Figuren mit gelben Regenschirmen in der Umgebung beziehen sich indirekt auf die Demokratiebewegung „Umbrella Movement“ in Hongkong. Zugleich klingt hier das Erlebnis einer Begräbnisprozession in Sri Lanka mit, die Kris Lemsalu verfolgen konnte. Car2Go  wurde von der Künstlerin bei der Erstpräsentation zum Gegenstand einer Performance umgewandelt. Dabei umarmte sie die Engelsgestalt, um langsam zu deren Füßen herunter zu gleiten; eine eher tragische, an die Beweinung Marias am Kreuze gemahnende Geste oder ein Kommentar zur aktuellen politischen Lage schlechthin.

Die aus Luxemburg stammende und in Deutschland lebende Künstlerin Mary-Audrey Ramirez (*1990, Luxemburg) studierte Multimedia an der Universität der bildenden Künste in Berlin. Im Zentrum ihres Interesses stehen skulpturale Arbeiten und Installationen. Für ihre früheren zweidimensionalen Bilder entwickelte sie eine besondere Technik: Mit Hilfe einer Nähmaschine schuf sie auf Leinwand oder Rupfen lineare Gebilde, die zunächst spontan entstanden, um sich im Laufe des Nähens in lesbare Konfigurationen zu verwandeln. Es sind rätselhafte, von Menschen und Tieren bevölkerte Szenerien, deren Akteure sich miteinander verweben und in metamorphischen Begegnungen ihre Identität wechseln. Leben, Empathie und Sexualität begegnen der Gewalt und dem Tod, Tiere greifen andere an und werden selbst gefressen. Diese düsteren Szenarien werden jedoch spielerisch gebrochen und ins Märchenhafte überführt. Seit 2013 entstehen plastische Arbeiten, meist thematisch auf die Übergänge zwischen dem Antropomorphen und Animalischen konzentriert. Bei ihren Recherchen entdeckte Mary-Audrey Ramirez für sich die Welt des in Europa immer noch existierenden Volksbrauchtums, besonders jener bei ländlichen Fasnachten und Karnevalsritualen getragenen Masken und Kostüme, mit denen sich Menschen in Tiere, Pflanzen und wilde Geister verwandeln. In einigen ihrer Performances und skulpturalen Werke bezieht sie sich auf diese Inspiration. Große und kleine Tiere wie Flamingos, Pelikane, Hängebauchschweine, Tapire, Rochen und Füchse treten bei Ramirez wie in „Alice in Horrorland“ in doppelbödigen Rollen auf. Sie nehmen menschliche Verhaltensweisen an, verharren jedoch in der eigenen animalischen Welt, die ihnen letztlich die Oberhand über den Menschen gewährt.

Zdenek Felix, Februar 2017