Thomas Zipp The World´s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People

21 November 2009–27 February 2010
The World´s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People, 2009
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Thomas Zipp
The World´s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People, 2009
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Thomas Zipp
The World´s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People, 2009
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Thomas Zipp
The World´s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People, 2009
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Thomas Zipp
The World´s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People, 2009
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Thomas Zipp
The World´s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Thomas Zipp
The World´s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Thomas Zipp
The World´s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Thomas Zipp
The World´s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People, 2009
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Thomas Zipp
The World´s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People, 2009
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Thomas Zipp
The World´s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Thomas Zipp
The World´s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People, 2009
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Thomas Zipp

Galerie Guido W. Baudach is pleased to present The World’s Most Complete Congress of Strange People, its fifth solo-exhibition by Thomas Zipp since 2000. The artist, who was born in 1966 and lives in Berlin, takes his wide-ranging points of reference from art history, science, politics and psychology. Zipp uncovers hidden connections between these themes and deploys them with a playful sense of humour in his artwork. Conventional or canonical readings ofvarious systems of signs and meaning are called into question by consistent interweaving and superimposition. They are replaced by new chains of interlinked statements with their own unique logic. Zipp’s work can thus only be understood associatively and never by analysis alone.

For The World’s Most Complete Congress of Strange People, Zipp – and this is typical of his working methods – has dissociated himself from the existing architecture and created a spatial situation specific to the artworks. This contorted formation on stilts, which has, so to speak, lodged itself in the gallery space, draws the visitor through a narrow gorge and into the interior, where a different world opens up: a world of illusion and expanded (self-)perception. A steep wooden mountain rises up in the midst of this installation, dark and massive, coarsely put together from the wrecked chip-board that once made up the central wall of the gallery, and surrounded by a kind of wall of mirrors and images that continue the mountain motif in paint. The intermediary space is populated by nine existentially playful harlequin-sculptures who appear like strange
watchmen at a clandestine gathering. Their small heads, slotted together from wooden shapes rest on slender plinths that also serve as their bodies, with extra-long arms hanging down on either side. In his drawings, Zipp often emphasizes and animates the eyes of the subjects portrayed by covering them with upholstery tacks. One’s gaze is rebounded off these reflective surfaces and turned back on the beholder. The same applies, if in an incomparably more contorted and disfigured manner, to the concave and convex forms of the mirrored screens, which Zipp also sees as drawings – they are covered with cryptic messages in encoded letters and recall the partition-screen architecture of his touring exhibition of 2007/8, Planet Caravan? Is There Life After Death? a Futuristic World Fair. But it’s not just the beholder himself who’s reflected here; the sculpted mountain, the harlequins, the paintings, and the surrounding gallery space as such are also reflected along with him, so that a variety of levels are superimposed and drawn together into new images. Zipp playfully takes on the loaded symbolic content of the mirror here: the paradigmatic allegory of vanity and narcissism, but also of reflection and self-awareness, and, not least, also a picture of the human soul itself. Ultimately, then, anyone who visits Zipp’s psychotic hall of mirrors becomes a delegate at the World’s Most Complete Congress of Strange People just as much as the harlequins and the composer Karl-Heinz Stockhausen, whose portrait adorns the invite. The gaze, the image, and the exhibition itself are all subject to continual alteration.

The jagged and apparently inhospitable mountain landscape between the mirrors serves to reflect different states of human consciousness or spirit, and Zipp continues this in other ways. The skies are overlaid with patterns, which, like the contorted mirrors, have a psychedelic effect. Vision falters, it becomes unclear what’s there and what’s not, perception becomes unreliable. Against the backdrop of this uncertainty the ragged black shadows with their deep gorges and chasms, or forms that slowly ascend from the sides and come to a point at the centre, suddenly seem to be more than mere abstracted mountain landscapes; they can be read in terms of a sexual symbolism pushing up from the depths of the unconscious. And what becomes clear here, if not before, can ultimately also be said of The World’s Most Complete Congress of Strange People as a whole: the play with the psychological possibilities of reading and interpretation and constant referencing of the traditional cultural and historical symbolism of the mirror is consciously left open – a treatment of complex subject matter that is virtually paradigmatic of Zipp’s art.
         
         
Thomas Zipp is a professor at the Universität der Künste in Berlin. A solo-exhibition entitled MENS SANA IN CORPORE SANO will be on show at the Fridericianum in Kassel from March to June, 2010.

Thomas Zipp took part in numerous group exhibitions at diverse galleries and art institutions: Die andere Seite, Kai 10, Düsseldorf (2009) / Berlin2000, PaceWildenstein, New York (2009) / Heavy Metal – Die unerklärbare Leichtigkeit eines Materials, Kunsthalle zu Kiel (2008) / Sympathy fort he Devil: Art and Rock and Roll Since 1967, Museum of Contemporary Art Miami, Museum of Contemporary Art Montreal, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (2008/07) / Vertrautes Terrain – Aktuelle Kunst in & über Deutschland, ZKM, Karlsruhe (2008) / Back to Black – Schwarz in der aktuellen Malerei, kestnergesellschaft, Hannover (2008) / The Hamsterwheel, Malmo Konsthall (2008) / Euro-Centric. Part 1, Rubell Familly Collection, Miami (2007) / Mystic Truths, Auckland Gallery (2007) / Made in Germany, kestnergesellschaft, Hannover (2007) / Defamation of Character, P.S.1, New York (2006) / Rings of Saturn, Tate Modern, London (2006) / When Humour Becomes Painful, Migrosmuseum für Gegenwartskunst, Zurich (2006) / Central Station (Collection Harald Falckenberg), La Maison Rouge, Paris (2004) / actionbutton, Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin (2003) / Painting on the Roof, Museum Abteiberg, Mönchengladbach (2004) / Viva November, Städtische Galerie Wolfsburg (2001) / Montana Sacra (Circles 5), ZKM, Karlsruhe (2001) / Deathrace 2000, Thread Waxing Space, New York (2000) / The Bridges – Art On The Highway, Fuori Uso 2000, Pescara (2000) / Stuttgart 17.5.56 – Salem (Wisconsin USA), 3.3.77, Portikus, Frankfurt/M. (1999)

Solo shows of Thomas Zipp were presented at various galleries and art institutions, for example: MENS AGITAT MOLEM (Luther & The Family of Pills), Sammlung Goetz, Munich (2009) / ILSATIN, Galleria Francesca Kaufmann, Milan (2009) / World Health. Mental Health, Sommer Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv (2008) / Planet Caravan? Is There Life After Death? a Futuristic World Fair, Museum Dhondt Dhaenens, Deurle, Museum in der Alten Post, Mühlheim, Kunsthalle Mannheim (2008/07) / Dwarf Nose, Harris Lieberman gallery, New York (2008) / The Family of Ornament und Verbrechen, Galerie Krinzinger, Vienna (2007) / Hier (Futuristic Mess), Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle, Munich (2006) / Geist über Materie, Patrick Painter Inc., Santa Monica / Achtung! Vision: N.I.B., Alison Jacques Gallery, London (2005) / Dirty Tree Black Pills, Kunstverein Oldenburg (2005) / The New Breed, Galerie Michael Neff und Parisa Kind, Frankfurt/M. (2004) / od, Maschenmode – Galerie Guido W. Baudach, Berlin (2000)

Die Galerie Guido W. Baudach freut sich, mit The World’s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People ihre fünfte Einzelausstellung von Thomas Zipp seit 2000 zu präsentieren. Die weit gestreuten thematischen Bezugspunkte des 1966 geborenen, in Berlin lebenden Künstlers finden sich in Kunstgeschichte und Wissenschaft ebenso wie in Politik und Psychologie – Themen, zwischen denen Zipp verborgene Verbindungslinien offen legt, welche er mit spielerischem Humor in seiner Kunst umsetzt. Durch stetige Überlagerungen und Verschachtelungen unterschiedlicher Zeichen- und Sinnsysteme werden deren herkömmliche, kanonisierte Lesarten in Frage gestellt. An ihre Stelle treten neue Aussageverkettungen, denen stets eine ganz eigene Logik zugrunde liegt. Somit erschließen sich Zipps Werke niemals nur rein analytisch, sondern immer auch assoziativ.

Für die Ausstellung The World’s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People hat sich Zipp, wie es für seine Arbeitweise typisch ist, von der vorgegebenen Architektur gelöst und eine eigens für die Werke geschaffene Raumsituation errichtet. Dieses sich windende und auf Stelzen stehende Gebilde, das sich gleichsam eingenistet hat in den Galerieraum, zieht den Besucher durch einen schmalen Schlund in sein Inneres, wo sich eine andere Welt eröffnet: eine Welt des Wahns und der erweiterten (Selbst-)Wahrnehmung. Inmitten dieser Installation erhebt sich massiv und dunkel ein aus zertrümmerten Spanplatten, die zuvor einmal die Galeriemittelwände stellten, grob zusammengetackertes, schroffes Holzgebirge, das von einer Art Mauer aus Spiegeln und Gemälden, die das Gebirgsmotiv malerisch weiterführen, umgeben ist. Der Raum dazwischen wird von neun existenziell-verspielt anmutenden Harlekin-Skulpturen bevölkert, die wie seltsame Wächter einer geheimen Zusammenkunft erscheinen. Ihre kleinen, aus Holzformen zusammengesteckten Köpfe ruhen auf schlanken Sockeln, die zugleich ihre Körper sind und von denen zu beiden Seiten die überlangen Arme herunterhängen. In seinen Zeichnungen betont und verlebendigt Zipp die Augen der Portraitierten oftmals, indem er diese durch Polsternägel verdeckt. Der Blick prallt an der spiegelnden Oberfläche ab und wird auf das eigene Abbild zurückgelenkt. Gleiches, wenn auch in ungleich verzerrterer und entstellterer Form, geschieht hier nun durch die teilweise konvex und konkav geformten Spiegelstellwände, die Zipp ebenfalls als Zeichnungen versteht und die mit kryptisch verschlüsselten Botschaften aus Buchstaben versehen sind und an die Stellwand-Architektur seiner monumentalen Wanderausstellung Planet Caravan? Is There Life After Death? a Futuristic World Fair aus den Jahren 2007/8 erinnern. Es spiegelt sich jedoch nicht nur der Betrachter selbst, sondern mit ihm auch das skulpturale Gebirge, die Harlekine, die Gemälde sowie der sie umgebende Galerieraum als solcher, so dass sich verschiedenste Ebenen überlagern und sich zu neuen Bildern zusammensetzen. Spielerisch setzt Zipp sich hier mit dem hohen Symbolgehalt des Spiegels auseinander, dem paradigmatischen Sinnbild für Eitelkeit und Narzissmus, aber auch für Reflexion und Selbsterkenntnis, sowie nicht zuletzt auch als Abbild für die menschliche Seele selbst. Am Ende nimmt so jeder Besucher von Zipps psychotischem Spiegelsaal genauso am World’s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People teil, wie die Harlekine und der Komponist Karl-Heinz Stockhausen, dessen von Zipp bearbeitetes Portrait die Einladungskarte ziert. Nicht nur der Blick, sondern auch das Bild und die Ausstellung an sich sind hier kontinuierlicher Veränderung unterworfen.

Die Bespiegelung der verschiedenen Zustände des menschlichen Bewusstseins bzw. Geistes führt Zipp mit den zwischen den Spiegeln montierten, unwirtlich erscheinenden, verstrahlten Gebirgslandschaften auf eine andere Weise fort. Die Himmel sind mit Mustern überzogen, die ähnlich wie die verzerrenden Spiegel eine psychedelische Wirkung entfalten. Der Blick entgleitet, was tatsächlich da ist und was nicht, wird unklar, die Wahrnehmung wird unzuverlässig. Die schwarzen zackigen Schatten mit ihren tiefen Schluchten und Abgründen oder die von den Seiten langsam ansteigenden, in der Mitte spitz zulaufenden Formen erscheinen vor dem Hintergrund dieser Verunsicherung plötzlich nicht mehr nur als abstrahierte Gebirgslandschaften, sondern werden auch im Sinne einer tief aus dem Unbewussten hervordrängenden sexuellen Symbolik lesbar. Und was spätestens hier deutlich wird, lässt sich letzten Endes für The World’s Most Complete Congress Of Strange People in seiner Gesamtheit behaupten: Das Spiel mit den tiefenpsychologisch fundierten Möglichkeiten des Lesens und Deutens und das beständige Verweisen auf die kulturgeschichtlich tradierte Spiegel-Symbolik wird bewusst offen gehalten – ein Umgang mit einer komplexen Thematik, die für Zipps Kunst geradezu paradigmatisch ist.
         
         
Thomas Zipp ist Professor an der Universität der Künste in Berlin. Von März bis Juni 2010 wird unter dem Titel MENS SANA IN CORPORE SANO eine Einzelausstellung im Fridericianum in Kassel zu sehen sein.

Thomas Zipp hat sich u.a. an folgenden Gruppenausstellungen beteiligt: Die andere Seite, Kai 10, Düsseldorf (2009) / Berlin2000, PaceWildenstein, New York (2009) / Heavy Metal – Die unerklärbare Leichtigkeit eines Materials, Kunsthalle zu Kiel (2008) / Sympathy fort he Devil: Art and Rock and Roll Since 1967, Museum of Contemporary Art Miami, Museum of Contemporary Art Montreal, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (2008/07) / Vertrautes Terrain – Aktuelle Kunst in & über Deutschland, ZKM, Karlsruhe (2008) / Back to Black – Schwarz in der aktuellen Malerei, kestnergesellschaft, Hannover (2008) / The Hamsterwheel, Malmö Konsthall (2008) / Euro-Centric. Part 1, Rubell Familly Collection, Miami (2007) / Mystic Truths, Auckland Gallery (2007) / Made in Germany, kestnergesellschaft, Hannover (2007) / Defamation of Character, P.S.1, New York (2006) / Rings of Saturn, Tate Modern, London (2006) / When Humour Becomes Painful, Migrosmuseum für Gegenwartskunst, Zürich (2006) / Central Station (Collection Harald Falckenberg), La Maison Rouge, Paris (2004) / actionbutton, Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin (2003) / Painting on the Roof, Museum Abteiberg, Mönchengladbach (2004) / Viva November, Städtische Galerie Wolfsburg (2001) / Montana Sacra (Circles 5), ZKM, Karlsruhe (2001) / Deathrace 2000, Thread Waxing Space, New York (2000) / The Bridges – Art On The Highway, Fuori Uso 2000, Pescara (2000) / Stuttgart 17.5.56 – Salem (Wisconsin USA), 3.3.77, Portikus, Frankfurt/M. (1999)

Einzelausstellungen fanden u.a. in folgenden Institutionen und Galerien statt: MENS AGITAT MOLEM (Luther & The Family of Pills), Sammlung Goetz, München (2009) / ILSATIN, Galleria Francesca Kaufmann, Mailand (2009) / World Health. Mental Health, Sommer Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv (2008) / Planet Caravan? Is There Life After Death? a Futuristic World Fair, Museum Dhondt Dhaenens, Deurle, Museum in der Alten Post, Mühlheim, Kunsthalle Mannheim (2008/07) / Dwarf Nose, HarrisLieberman gallery, New York (2008) / The Family of Ornament und Verbrechen, Galerie Krinzinger, Wien (2007) / Hier (Futuristic Mess), Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle, München (2006) / Geist über Materie, Patrick Painter Inc., Santa Monica / Achtung! Vision: N.I.B., Alison Jacques Gallery, London (2005) / Dirty Tree Black Pills, Kunstverein Oldenburg (2005) / The New Breed, Galerie Michael Neff und Parisa Kind, Frankfurt/M. (2004) / od, Maschenmode – Galerie Guido W. Baudach, Berlin (2000)