Jasmin Werner Seniorita Latifa Sharifah

11 September–16 October 2021
Schloss der Republik Burj Khalifa OFW III, 2021
Jasmin Werner

Shuttering props, LED Spotlight, threaded rods, screws, nuts, aluminium, backlit foil, plastic foil, printed mesh fencing
300 × 81 × 82 cm I  118 × 32 × 32 1/4 in

Seniorita Latifa Sharifah
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Jasmin Werner
Seniorita Latifa Sharifah
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Jasmin Werner
Seniorita Latifa Sharifah
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Jasmin Werner
Jasmin Werner
Wholly Family III, 2018
Jasmin Werner

Metal ornament (halo), toy corn, wood, aluminium, threaded rods, nuts, butterfly nuts
60 × 34 × 28 cm I 23 2/3 × 13 1/2 × 11 in

Wholly Family IV, 2021
Jasmin Werner

Aluminium, wood, bottle brush, apple, plaster, ink pen, coloured crayon, threaded rods, nuts, toy fruit and vegetables, metal ornament (halo)
58 × 39 × 17 cm I 22 3/4 × 15 1/3 × 6 2/3 in

Jasmin Werner
Schloss der Republik Burj Khalifa OFW II, 2021
Jasmin Werner

LED Spotlight, threaded rods, screws, nuts, aluminium, backlit foil, plastic foil, printed mesh fencing
114 × 82 × 53 I 45 × 32 1/4 × 20 3/4 in

Seniorita Latifa Sharifah
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Jasmin Werner
Schloss der Republik Burj Khalifa OFW V, 2021
Jasmin Werner

Shuttering props, LED Spotlight, threaded rods, screws, nuts, aluminium, stone, wood, spray paint, backlit foil, plastic foil, printed mesh fencing
285 × 82 × 87 cm I 112 1/4 × 32 1/4 × 34 1/4 in

Seniorita Latifa Sharifah
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Jasmin Werner
Seniorita Latifa Sharifah
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Jasmin Werner
Schloss der Republik Burj Khalifa OFW I, 2021
Jasmin Werner

LED Spotlight, threaded rods, screws, nuts, aluminium, backlit foil, plastic foil, printed mesh fencing
114 × 82 × 32 cm I 45 × 32 1/4 × 12 2/3 in

Seniorita Latifa Sharifah
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Jasmin Werner
Schloss der Republik Burj Khalifa OFW IV, 2021
Jasmin Werner

LED Spotlight, threaded rods, screws, nuts, aluminium, backlit foil, plastic foil, printed mesh fencing
114 × 81 29 cm I 45 × 32 × 11 1/2 in

Wholly Family V, 2021
Jasmin Werner

Aluminium, wood, bottle brush, plaster, ink pen, apple, plaster, threaded rods, nuts, zip tie, toy vegetables, metal ornament (halo)
76 × 34 × 20 cm I 30 × 13 1/2 × 7 3/4 in

Galerie Guido W. Baudach is delighted to present its first solo exhibition with Cologne-based German-Filipino artist Jasmin Werner. On display are two brand-new series of assemblage-like sculptures of her usual peculiar materiality which are as allusive as cryptically titled Wholly Family and Schloss der Republik Burj Khalifa OFW. The following text by Dubai and New York-based writer Rahel Aima not only describes the works, but also provides a very personal introduction to their broader context.

Around the time I learned to drive, sometime in the mid-2000s, a very large billboard went up in Dubai. It was emblazoned with the phrase “History Rising” and faced the highway, as these things do. To travel along the city’s arterial Sheikh Zayed Road is to see the billboards flashing the future before your eyes: new megadevelopments, like property ladders to heaven; fancy cars; and the latest smartphones, all exclusively featuring smiling white and Arab faces. Only during Diwali, the Hindu festival of lights, would we see the South Asians who make up the majority of the population, in the form of Bolly/Lolly/Tollywood stars advertising gold jewelry. Absent entirely are Overseas Filipino Workers or OFWs. Behind all the signage are nesting-doll-like layers of fencing, scaffolding, mesh, and netting and so many cranes, all protectively encircling reinforced concrete shells.
Jasmin Werner’s Schloss der Republik Burj Khalifa OFW works have the same feel. The mesh is printed with building facades and hugs the scaffolding like a dancer’s port de bras, while backlighting reminds us of the gossamer-thin liminal space—the Barzakh, in Islamic eschatology—between one world and the next. Photographs taken by Werner‘s Filipina cousin, an OFW herself, bespeak the lives behind all those screens and glass: the ubiquitous ground floor hair salon, for example, or the maximalist, curlicued style of decoration. In between these spatially imposing sculptures that rise like the scaffolding of a construction site, cheery plastic shopping trolleys hide extension cords even as they remind us that after peak oil comes peak plastic.
Dubai is a funny kind of place, where the future feels more certain than narratives of the past, which have been erased and rewritten so many times that they take on a palimpsestic quality. It is a city built with aeriality in mind, designed to be seen through a drone’s eye view, or from the Moon (and soon, Mars). A trio of austere ladder sculptures captures this yearning verticality, through assemblages of gleaming steel, plastic vegetables, and beaded, chandelier-like tops that suggest nothing so much as sombrero hats even as they refer to Pinoy sacred objects. One sculpture in particular,
Wholly Family V, which boasts some rather construction-crane-like legs, says nothing so much as "Howdy. I’m the sheriff of rewriting history. "
I was a nervous driver but always craned my neck to see that gigantic billboard. It featured a glossy rendering of the Burj Dubai surrounded by dancing fountains and dwarfing all the other buildings around it. Like the COVID-19 bar graphs so common today, the building was so tall that it exceeded the rectangular frame, its metal cylinders jutting elegantly into the sky. Behind it, the world’s tallest building slowly grew. During the financial crash, Dubai would have to be bailed out by neighboring Abu Dhabi. The Burj Dubai was renamed the Burj Khalifa, after its new benefactor.

That this paean to capitalist excess was built with steel girders from Berlin’s demolished German Democratic Republic-era Palace of the Republic seems right somehow. So does the Palazzo Prozzo’s replacement institution, the Humboldt Forum, which has become a flashpoint in the debates around the restitution of looted colonial objects. It is nice to think of anything, even inanimate metal, getting a second chance at life, in this case with sunshine and a killer view. And it is even more fitting that Werner’s new Burj Khalifa series and the pedestals upon which the ladder sculptures sit are themselves recycled from an older pair of City Palace-Burj Khalifa works shown outdoors in 2019 at the communal gallery Bärenzwinger, sited in Berlin’s former bear pits. In a few hundred years, assuming that climate change allows us to live that long, what will the Burj Khalifa be recycled into?
Germany may send high-grade socialist steel; other countries send their workers, and in turn these workers send back so many Gulfy goods. In 1990s Kerala, where much of Dubai’s population comes from, this might have meant bottles of space-age orange drink mixes and powdered milk, electronics, and luridly patterned plush blankets, an immigrant symbol as universal as the left arm scar of tuberculosis vaccinations that are present on everyone over a certain age. For people from the Philippines, this might take the form of the balikbayan box, the country‘s own variant of the care package. For most, it takes the form of monetary remittances to support your family at home, cash and dreams of a reunited future cast yellow under a glowing Western Union sign.
 
– Rahel Aima

 

Jasmin Werner born in Troisdorf 1987, studied at HfG Karlsruhe, Rietveld Academy Amsterdam and Städelschule Frankfurt and has since participated in various exhibitions at home and abroad, such as Unschuldsengel, Project room of Westfälischer Kunstverein, Münster, 2021 (solo); Façadomy, Damien & The Love Guru, Brussels, 2020 (solo); The Wheel of Life Remise, Kunstverein Braunschweig, 2020 (solo); Musée sentimentale de l’ours de Berlin, Bärenzwinger, Berlin, 2020; RAW, DuMont Kunsthalle, Cologne, 2019; Ein Pfund Orangen, Kunstverein Ingolstadt, 2019; The same as ever, but more so, Braunsfelder, Cologne, 2018; 19 positions, Folkwang Museum, Essen, 2017; Status Faux, Gillmeier Rech, 2017 (solo).
In 2017, Jasmin Werner completed a residency at National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul.

 

Die Galerie Guido W. Baudach ist hocherfreut, ihre erste Einzelausstellung mit der in Köln lebenden, deutsch-philippinischen Künstlerin Jasmin Werner zu präsentieren. Gezeigt werden zwei neue Serien assemblageartiger Skulpturen von gewohnt eigener Materialität, die mit Wholly Family und Schloss der Republik Burj Khalifa OFW ebenso allusive wie präzise betitelt sind. Der nachfolgende Text der in Dubai und New York ansässigen Schriftstellerin Rahel Aima beschreibt die Arbeiten nicht allein, sondern liefert auch eine sehr persönlich gehaltene Einführung in den weiterführenden Kontext.

Als ich meinen Führerschein machte, Mitte der 2000er Jahre, wurde in Dubai eine riesige Plakatwand aufgestellt. Wie üblich zur Straße hin ausgerichtet prangte darauf der Slogan History Rising, zu Deutsch: Geschichte Emporsteigend. Wenn man den Sheikh Zayed Highway entlangfährt, die Hauptverkehrsader der Stadt, blitzt die Zukunft vor einem auf; und zwar in Form neuer gigantischer Bauprojekte – Immobilien wie Himmelsleitern – , extravaganter Autos und der aktuellsten Smartphone-Modelle, ausschließlich beworben von weißen und arabischen Gesichtern. Menschen aus südostasiatischen Ländern, wie sie die Mehrheit der Bevölkerung Dubais ausmachen, sieht man auf den Werbetafeln dagegen lediglich zu Zeiten des hinduistischen Lichterfests Diwali, wenn Bolly-, Lolly- und Tollywood-Stars Goldschmuck anpreisen. Überseeische Arbeitskräfte von den Philippinen, sogenannte Overseas Filipino Workers, kurz: OFWs, fehlen sogar komplett. Hinter den Werbetafeln finden sich ähnlich den Matrjoschka-Puppen ineinander verschachtelte Schichten von Zäunen, Gerüsten, Maschendraht, Baustellennetzen und vielerlei Kränen, die allesamt schützend einen Rohbau aus Stahlbeton umschließen.
Jasmin Werners Arbeiten aus der Werkserie
Schloss der Republik Burj Khalifa OFW muten ganz ähnlich an. Ein mit Gebäudefassaden bedrucktes Netzgewebe schmiegt sich gleich einem tänzerischen Port de bras an ein Gerüst, dessen Hintergrundbeleuchtung Assoziationen an den Barzach weckt, jenen hauchdünnen Schwellenraum, der in der islamischen Eschatologie das Diesseits vom Jenseits trennt. Die darin eingearbeiteten Fotografien der in Dubai lebenden philippinische Cousine von Jasmin Werner, ihrerseits selbst eine OFW, zeigen, was hinter den zahlreichen Sichtblenden und dem vielen Glas liegt: der unvermeidliche Friseursalon im Erdgeschoß zum Beispiel oder die überbordend verschnörkelten Interieurs. Inmitten von Werners raumgreifenden Skulpturen, die sich wie Baustellengerüste auftürmen, stehen leuchtend bunte Spielzeugeinkaufswägen, in denen Mehrfachstecker und Verlängerungskabel verborgen sind, und die mich unweigerlich daran denken lassen, dass es nach dem Peak Oil auch ein Peak Plastic gibt.
Dubai ist ein seltsamer Ort. Auf die Zukunft scheint hier mehr Verlass zu sein als auf die Erzählung von der Vergangenheit, die schon so oft getilgt und umgeschrieben wurde, dass sie einem Palimpsest ähnelt. Die Stadt wurde nach Maßgabe der Vogelperspektive gebaut; entworfen, um von Drohnen, vom Mond und bald auch vom Mars aus gesehen zu werden. Ein Trio von strengen Treppenskulpturen verkörpert diese sehnsüchtige Vertikalität; Assemblagen aus glänzendem Stahl, Plastikgemüse und umbördelten Aufsätzen wie Kronleuchter, die gleichzeitig an Sombreros erinnern, wobei es sich eigentlich um sakral konnotierte Gegenstände der Pinoy handelt, wie die Einheimischen auf den Philippinen sich nennen. Vor allem
Wholly Family V, eine Skulptur auf baukranähnlichen Füßen, scheint zu sagen: „Howdy, ich bin der Sheriff der Geschichtsumschreibung.“
Ich war eine unsichere Autofahrerin, doch trotzdem reckte ich jedes Mal den Hals, um einen Blick auf die riesige Werbetafel zu erhaschen. Darauf war eine Hochglanzdarstellung des Burj Dubai zu sehen, umgeben von Wasserspielen und anderen Gebäuden, die im Vergleich dazu winzig aussahen. Der Turm war so hoch, dass er, wie derzeit üblich die Kurven der COVID-19-Diagramme, über die Begrenzung der Plakatwand hinaus elegant in den Himmel schoss. Hinter der Werbetafel wuchs das höchste Gebäude der Welt langsam, aber stetig in die Höhe. Während der Weltfinanzkrise allerdings musste Abu Dhabi seinem Nachbar Dubai finanziell unter die Arme greifen. Der Burj Dubai wurde nach dem neuen Wohltäter umbenannt in Burj Khalifa.
Dass dieser architektonische Lobgesang auf die Maßlosigkeit des Kapitalismus mit DDR-Stahlträgern aus dem abgerissenen Berliner Palast der Republik gebaut wurde, scheint in gewisser Weise bloß folgerichtig. So folgerichtig wie die Tatsache, dass der Nachfolgebau des Palazzo Prozzo, das Humboldt-Forum, zu einem Brennpunkt in der Debatte um die Restitution geraubter Kolonialobjekte geworden ist. Andererseits ist es eine schöne Vorstellung, dass alles, sogar Metall, über seine ursprüngliche Bestimmung hinaus weiterexistieren kann, in diesem Fall sogar mit Sonnenschein und einer grandiosen Aussicht.
Umso passender erscheint es auch, dass Jasmin Werners neue
Burj Khalifa-Serie sowie einige der Sockel, auf denen die Treppenskulpturen stehen, ihrerseits aus zwei früheren Arbeiten der selben Serie recycelt wurden, die 2019 im Außenbereich der kommunalen Galerie im ehemaligen Berliner Bärenzwinger ausgestellt waren. So fragt es sich, zu was, sofern das Leben auf der Erde trotz Klimawandel noch einige hundert Jahre weitergeht, der Burj Khalifa einmal recycelt werden wird.
Während Deutschland hochwertigen sozialistischen Stahl schickt, schicken andere Länder ihre Arbeiter*innen, und diese wiederum schicken Produkte aus dem Golf in ihre Heimatländer. Auf diesem Wege erreichten in den 1990er Jahren den indischen Bundesstaat Kerala, aus dem ein Großteil der Bevölkerung der Vereinigten Arabischen Emirate stammt, ein weltraumerprobtes Getränkepulver, Trockenmilch, Elektrogeräte und grell gemusterte Plüschdecken – ein Migrationssymbol, so allgegenwärtig wie die Tuberkulose-Impfnarbe, die fast jede*r ab einem gewissen Alter am linken Oberarm trägt.
Auf den Philippinen wiederum kommen sogenannte Balikbayan-Pakete an, die landestypische Variante des Care-Pakets. Zumeist jedoch werden die Familien im jeweiligen Heimatland mit direkten monetären Zuwendungen unterstützt; Bargeld und Träume von einer gemeinsamen Zukunft sind in gelbes Licht getaucht. Sie schimmern im Schein einer Leuchtreklame von Western-Union.

 – Rahel Aima
Übersetzt von Gregor Runge


Jasmin Werner, geboren 1987 in Troisdorf, hat an der HfG Karlsruhe, der Rietveld Academy Amsterdam und der Städelschule Frankfurt studiert und seither an verschiedenen Ausstellung im In- und Ausland teilgenommen, wie z.B. Unschuldsengel, Projektraum von / Project room of Westfälischer Kunstverein, Münster, 2021 (solo); Façadomy, Damien & The Love Guru, Brüssel, 2020 (solo); The Wheel of Life Remise, Kunstverein Braunschweig, 2020 (solo); Musée sentimentale de l’ours de Berlin, Bärenzwinger, Berlin, 2020; RAW, DuMont Kunsthalle, Köln, 2019; Ein Pfund Orangen, Kunstverein Ingolstadt, 2019; The same as ever, but more so, Braunsfelder, Köln, 2018; 19 positions, Folkwang Museum, Essen, 2017; Status Faux, Gillmeier Rech, 2017 (solo).
2017 absolvierte Jasmin Werner eine Residency am National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul.