Tamina Amadyar out of the blue

12 September–31 October 2020
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach
blue world, 2020
Tamina Amadyar

Pigment, glutin on canvas
170 x 230 cm

bel air, 2020
Tamina Amadyar

Pigment, glutin on canvas
200 x 160 cm

nest, 2020
Tamina Amadyar

Pigment, glutin on canvas
200 x 160 cm

chinese, 2020
Tamina Amadyar

Watercolor on paper
48 x 36 cm, framed

devoure, 2020
Tamina Amadyar

Watercolor on paper
48 x 36 cm, framed

overlook, 2020
Tamina Amadyar

Pigment, glutin on canvas
150 x 130 cm

living room, 2020
Tamina Amadyar

Pigment, glutin on canvas
170 x 150 cm

closet, 2020
Tamina Amadyar

Pigment, glutin on canvas
200 x 170 cm

sundays, 2020
Tamina Amadyar

Pigment, glutin on canvas
200 x 160 cm

soli, 2020
Tamina Amadyar

Watercolor on paper
48 x 36 cm, framed

closing time, 2020
Tamina Amadyar

Watercolor on paper
48 x 36 cm, framed

Summer Days in the House of Friends
by Andreas Prinzing

 

Poetry starts where meaning ceases.
 – Etel Adnan

 

Plane, train, bus. It is hot, and increasingly empty. I disembark shortly before the border. Caviano, Ticino. This sleepy nest is still part of Switzerland, but language and culture don’t care much about borders. It’s Italian that shapes day-to-day life here. I begin to climb, searching for a house that crouches within the green of the steep slope, the serpentine route leaving me somewhat out of breath. If you ever want to leave Berlin behind, the key lies under the stone, I hear a voice saying in my head. I arrive sweaty, and step into the semi-darkness of a cool hallway. Silence surrounds me – along with a smell that abruptly invokes memories of childhood holidays. The mixture of anticipation and curiosity. Hot, dreamy days, when time stretched out endlessly. And ultimately, the melancholy of the farewell. Hazy reminiscences of places and atmospheres resound and echo. Everything is new here, yet so much seems strangely familiar.

Once the shutters are opened, the sun streams aslant into the house. I step out onto the balcony and squint into the light. A light wind. Slowly the gaze widens, gliding along the wooded slopes of the opposite shore, following the crest of a mountain ridge. Above is the deep blue sky, below it the lake, stretching out like a huge mirror. The mountains are a stratified archive of time, formed by glacial melt water. Sky, earth, water. Shapes and light, all bathed in gradations of blue. The eye wanders, scans textures. The landscape, radiating calm and clarity, is created in the mind. Occasional clouds pass by, tousled and languid, casting their shadows onto the gently rippling water. Beneath that sparkling surface, a cool, indeterminable depth opens.

As I soak up the continually changing image, I have to think of Rebecca Solnit’s A Field Guide to Getting Lost (2006). In this collection of essays, Solnit wanders through external and internal landscapes and reflects on the color blue as a space for emotional resonance: “The world is blue at its edges and in its depths.[...] [It is] the color of there seen from here, the color of where you are not. And the color of where you can never go. For the blue is not in the place those miles away at the horizon, but in the atmospheric distance between you and the mountains.[...] Blue is the color of longing for the distances you never arrive in, for the blue world.”

The blue of the landscape opens an immaterial space that can only be entered visually. A presence that evades while simultaneously marking an unbridgeable distance. In spite of what we may know about physics and the diffusion of light, a strange magic always emanates anew from the distant radiance of the sky and the water. Nor does an explanation of the phenomenon detract from its magic. Can’t the same also be said of a good painting?

A steep path leads down to the lake. A small strip of land that runs into the water. In the distance are the silhouettes of two stand-up paddlers. I feel my way over the slippery rocks until the ground disappears beneath my feet. Diving into a wide-open space. Lightness, almost like floating. Then back to the shore. The water breaks against a wall in gentle, rhythmic waves. Fragments of words drift by, swirling with the voices and images in my head. Past and present, outside and inside blur together. And there, suddenly, are the light-flooded paintings of Tamina Amadyar, whose Kreuzberg studio I visited the week before. The atmosphere of this landscape has evoked them, brought them closer.

"A color has many faces", writes Josef Albers. If this is true, Tamina Amadyar works out her changing facial expressions in close-up. Her paintings impart dynamic gestures to color, letting them dance and vibrate like living bodies. Using pure pigment bound in rabbit-skin glue, Amadyar creates electrifying color landscapes of indeterminable depth. The surface itself – transparently primed, and left partially blank – is always an element of the composition. Without exception, the primarily large-format canvases never present more than two colors at a time. In a seemingly weightless manner, the two chosen colors activate eye and space equally on the limited terrain of the canvas. On occasion they may wrestle with one another, but in a playful way. Touch can also mean friction. While the compositions are clearly laid out, flow is created primarily within the color forms and the areas of transition. Depending on the choice of color and the brushwork, what results are paintings through which the eye wanders and others through which it is breathlessly chased. Brushstrokes that lie gently across a canvas. And highways of perception along which the gaze races, changing direction without ever coming to rest.

The paintings are a celebration of light. They are created on the floor in a rapid process that blends consideration and intuition, tension and release. A calculated loss of control, no corrections possible. The bases of these works are casual sketches made by felt-tipped pen and the occasional mobile phone photo. Extracts of everyday life. From a continuous flow of impressions, Tamina Amadyar plucks out whatever gets caught in the net of her subjective awareness: landscapes, spatial constellations, or an object. These find their way into her sketchbooks, which function as both visual diaries and repositories of images, holding a voluminous trove of colors and forms at the ready. A flotsam of motifs that she may only draw upon years later, in a process of translation, reduction and fragmentation. Everything gets passed once again through her filter.

At first glance, Amadyar’s works appear closely related to color field painting and the post-painterly abstraction of the 1950s and ‘60s. But they speak their own language. While the protagonists of post-war U.S. abstraction were mostly concerned with cutting all ties to an external reality in favor of an autonomous work of art, Tamina Amadyar works along different lines. Sure, the painting must function as a painting. But the small anchors that connect the pictorial space with her own experiences of reality, as well as those of the viewer, are of central importance. It is through precisely this referential trace that her work is loosely connected with a more recent line of tradition in painterly practice. Despite differing styles, techniques and questions posed, a visual spirit prevails here, an autobiographically grounded one, that is comparable to Mary Heilmann, Raoul de Keyser or Vivian Suter.

Occasionally, reproductions give the impression of being small, quick color studies on paper. They seem to radiate spontaneity, a sketch-like quality. This may be due to the interplay of loose gestures, simple form and a reduced color scheme on a canvas that is left partially bare. When one faces the paintings, the proportions shift. A blow-up. Even in Tamina Amadyar’s most recent works, the viewer does not encounter any complex compositional structures or formal elements. Until now, Amadyar frequently concentrated on very few constellations of form, playing with these – albeit with some deviations – in different variations of color and proportion. Despite the limitations, the resulting work had something playful about it, and open, far removed from the serial deconstruction of specific image parameters in analytical painting. With her new paintings, almost all of which are in portrait format, the repertoire of forms has grown and the operational framework has expanded once more. Succinct, signet-like forms appear, resonating with a pinch of pop. This is especially so when the pictures are hung closely together and begin to get in each other’s way like siblings with different temperaments, which thwarts contemplation of an individual painting in isolation and counteracts its aura-like charge.

living room (2020) is an eye-catcher, signal-like. With its intense cadmium red, wrapped around with a band of bottle green, it forms its own direct counterpart. A painting with a heartbeat that simultaneously lures and rebuffs the viewer. But its emblematic conciseness, the brash coloring and compact form with which it lures, are deceptive: The work refuses any clear message. Not a stop sign, but rather a springy trampoline. The broad line that loosely encloses the luminous color field, nearing the edge of the painting in doing so, forms neither a circle nor an octagon but something in between. Nor does Tamina Amadyar’s other work contain any strictly geometrically constructed figures. What predominates is the organic; those who look for right angles or symmetries will seek in vain. Something is always longer, shorter, wider or narrower, and it is precisely this that breathes life into the paintings, in addition to the irregular brushwork. It is through the small deviations in form that the works acquire their unmistakable identity. And what appears at first glance to be centered never actually is upon closer examination, but shifts slightly adrift through the framework of the canvas.

Despite its pronounced contours, living room does not come across as static. Rather, it is more like a state that is only momentarily fixed. The broad, energetic strokes at the center almost seem like the creation of a paint roller. As the pigment density decreases towards the edges and to the left of the painting’s center, the canvas partially flashes through and the color hints at the presence of depth. Opaqueness gives way to a subtle transparency; an organic corridor seems to lead into the interior of the energy field. The title refers to the central space of a home, a place of togetherness. It complements the warm tone of the painting and links it with Amadyar’s recently created watercolors. Titles always play an important role for her. They function as additional notes, she says, suggesting a direction, giving the paintings an airstream in which to move.

If Amadyar’s works were literature, they would not be prose, but rather haiku. With their condensed chords of color, the paintings can easily be related to poetry, another mode of evoking a great deal in condensed form, combining matter of fact expressions with the evocative power of words. If one runs further with this thought, the poetry of William Carlos Williams, for example, comes to mind. A leading figure of the Imagist movement, the American writer pleaded in the 1920s for the liberation of poetry from its metric corset and its emancipation from traditional models. Williams created poetry grounded on factuality that operates with an economy of means. A country doctor by profession, he found his motifs in everyday objects and slices of life in small towns, which he transformed into verbal images with lean, precise words: concentration over digression, simplicity over metaphor, surface over depth. The best-known of his poetic snapshots, which Williams also described as glimpses, reads:

so much depends
upon

a red wheel
barrow

glazed with rain
water

beside the white
chickens

Those lines contain all that a poem needs, black on white. In just a handful of words, The Red Wheelbarrow (1923) draws a closely framed slice of reality. It could hardly be more minimalist, and even after almost ninety years, the raindrops still gleam freshly on the red-painted wheelbarrow while the chickens continue to peck. Yet the closer we examine the poem, the more unclear the scene becomes before our inner eye. Ultimately, it remains a picture of vast openness. As do all the other everyday snapshots Williams penned, whether his gaze was focused on broken bottles, icebox plums or his neighbors.

The small-format watercolors that Tamina Amadyar has been creating since the beginning of this year revolve similarly around their immediate surroundings. Speed is decisive in this medium, which thus offers a rather ideal playing field for an artist with an appreciation for the irregular and any moment that runs contrary to rigidity. The dilute paint leads an expansive life of its own, leaving an even greater role to chance. Each work of watercolor is an experiment with an open ending. It is the letting go that makes the technique as appealing as it is difficult to master. What seems at first to be a leap is more so a consistent continuation of Amadyar’s painting practice. Figurative elements suddenly appear, and with them a narrative dimension. The tightly limited color radius undergoes an expansion as well. But haven’t there been interior spaces in her paintings before, even if they were devoid of people? And an enormous variety of colors in her sketchbooks?

While the artist’s elemental connection to personal experience is expressed only indirectly in her paintings, unencrypted moments from her private environment flow into her watercolors. The focus here is on ordinary, rather incidental situations and subjects, which she captures first as photographs and later transforms into watercolor. Greetings or goodbyes; family members as they read, think and dance. In other words, the obvious moments that comprise our rarely exceptional everyday lives. Moments of activity alternate with those of rest and interior movement. What is central is the closeness to life – though the term should not be understood in the sense of an accurate rendering.

With interiors, portraits and still lifes, Amadyar’s work ties in with pictorial genres that flourished in watercolor painting, especially in the 19th century. Rather than reprising their highly nuanced color gradations and delicate linework, she explores the expressive breadth of the medium with hasty lines, eruptive settings and soft dissolves. Some of the motifs shown in excerpts and from a slight overhead perspective have the feel of melting snapshots that wish to reach and expand over the edge of the paper. Dramas of color, rich in effect, are played out in the details. The degree of abstraction of the human figure is accordingly high. Whether subjects can be identified is of no matter, for the watercolors are better described as portraits of moods. While many of the works evoke a cheerful atmosphere, a melancholy mood runs through soli (2020). The watercolor depicts a possibly sleepless figure sitting in bed in a slightly sunken stance, the head rendered as no more than two or three diffuse blots of color. The jagged hair of the figure virtually blends into the brown-toned wall in the background, which appears to depict a sense of inner restlessness in fraying patches of color. The scene looks as if it could dissolve into a blur at any moment. The genesis and dissolution of form alternate in a state of flux. In its instability, the sheet of paper comes across at the same time as a symbol for the ever fragmentary process of memory.

Tamina Amadyar’s engagement with watercolor also has consequences for her painting practice. Isolated areas now emerge in her paintings in which the color takes on a life of its own and the broad, clearly contoured brushstrokes fray at their edges like a watercolor. This kind of effect, achieved by dilution, is also evident in parts of the landscape-format blue world (2020).

A painting like a summer day in CinemaScope. At the center, an azure-blue surface expands, embedded in swelling, cloud-like color fields of orange from which a warm glow emanates. A pulsating, complementary contrast. Neither of the colors stops at the sides of the frame, which has the effect of amplifying the scenery, evoking associations with a landscape. Isn’t that a slope in the foreground, descending towards the water, while an elongated mountain in the background caps off the upper third of the painting?

Everything is in motion. While the outer contours of the two orange color fields run almost parallel to the edges of the frame, they swing in large arcs towards the center. A restless brushwork underscores the dynamics of the image. Blue lies horizontally across the piece in long, translucent swathes of color suggestive of gentle waves, covering the orange and making it gleam as if from an indeterminable depth. The areas where the two colors meet tend towards violet, rusty brown or greenish. The intensity of the color application vacillates widely. As both diminish towards the center of the canvas, the orange becoming almost salmon-colored and the blue drifting into turquoise, a moving zone of light is created that runs diagonally through the painting. A landscape bathed in sunlight. Looking at the lower third of the frame, one can imagine seeing through clear water all the way to the bottom, while the orange in the upper third, covered by blue, appears as a reflection of the presumed mountain. The three-part layout echoes a compositional pattern that Amadyar developed after a trip to the west coast of the United States in 2018. Here, tilted into the horizontal, the reading of a landscape is the immediate result. The color scheme and graphic simplification of blue world are somewhat too pop to allow for meditative immersion. And yet the piece reveals a cooling pull upon the viewer.

Anyway, the blue. It runs like a thread through Tamina Amadyar’s visual world. Blue makes frequent appearances in the titles of her exhibitions, sometimes directly, as in Big Blue Sky, and sometimes indirectly, as with Making Waves. Her particular affinity to the color connects her in a certain way with Helen Frankenthaler, who likewise titled one of her paintings Out of the Blue. Frankenthaler, one of the major players in getting color field painting off the ground in the middle of the last century, once said: “My pictures are full of climates, abstract climates and not nature per se, but a feeling. And the feeling of an order that is associated more with nature.” By coupling the analogy of weather with subjective perception, she refers to a dimension that is central to her work. A similar sensibility for color’s qualities of emotional expression, its vitality and sensuousness, also resounds from Tamina Amadyar’s paintings. The most powerful of her seemingly casually thrown together works catapult us into another place as effortlessly as a pop song, even as we remain bound to the here and now.

A deafening noise tears me away from my thoughts. A helicopter is gliding over the lakeshore, its rotor drawing concentric rings on the dark, threatening surface of the water. The temperature has dropped; the weather is on the brink of change. As I set out on my way, I recall to myself, humming softly, the last line of Neil Young’s Out of the Blue, which gets to the heart of how so much of what appears clear cannot be grasped with rationality alone: “There’s more to the picture than meets the eye.”

 

 

 

Sommertage im Haus von Freunden
von Andreas Prinzing

 

Poetry starts where meaning ceases.
– Etel Adnan

 

Flugzeug, Bahn, Bus. Es ist heiß und wird immer leerer, kurz vor der Grenze steige ich aus. Caviano, Ticino. Das verschlafene Nest gehört noch zur Schweiz, doch Sprachen und Kulturen scheren sich wenig um Grenzziehungen, das Italienische bestimmt den Lebensalltag. Etwas außer Atem geht es die Serpentinen hinauf, ich suche nach einem ins Grün des Steilhanges geduckten Haus. „Falls Du Berlin mal hinter dir lassen möchtest, der Schlüssel liegt unterm Stein", höre ich eine Stimme in Gedanken sagen. Dann trete ich verschwitzt ins Halbdunkel eines kühlen Flures. Stille umfängt mich – und ein Geruch, der unvermittelt Erinnerungen an Urlaube meiner Kindheit aufsteigen lässt. Die Mischung aus Vorfreude und Neugier. Heiße, verträumte Tage, an denen sich die Zeit endlos dehnte. Schließlich die Melancholie des Abschieds. Vage Reminiszenzen an Orte und Atmosphären hallen wieder. Alles ist neu hier und doch scheint vieles seltsam vertraut.

Fensterläden auf, die schräg stehende Sonne strömt ins Haus. Ich trete auf den Balkon, blinzle ins Gegenlicht. Leichter Wind. Langsam weitet sich der Blick, gleitet bewaldete Hänge am Ufer gegenüber entlang, folgt dem Kamm einer Bergkette. Oben ein tiefblauer Himmel, unten dehnt sich der See wie ein riesiger Spiegel aus. Die Berge ein Archiv geschichteter Zeit, geformt vom Schmelzwasser der Gletscher. Himmel, Erde, Wasser. Formen und Licht, alles in Abstufungen blauer Farbe getaucht. Das Auge wandert, tastet Texturen ab. Die Landschaft, die Ruhe und Klarheit ausstrahlt, entsteht im Kopf. Vereinzelte Wolken ziehen zerzaust und träge vorbei, werfen ihre Schatten auf die sanft bewegte Wasserfläche. Unter ihrem Glitzern öffnet sich eine kühle, unbestimmte Tiefe.

Während ich das kontinuierlich wechselnde Bild einsauge, muss ich an Rebecca Solnits A Field Guide to Getting Lost (2006) denken. In ihrem essayistischen Streifzug durch äußere und innere Landschaften reflektiert die Autorin über die Farbe Blau als emotionaler Resonanzraum: „The world is blue at its edges and in its depths. (...) (It is) the color of there seen from here, the color of where you are not. And the color of where you can never go. For the blue is not in the place those miles away at the horizon, but in the atmospheric distance between you and the mountains. (...) Blue is the color of longing for the distances you never arrive in, for the blue world.“

Das Blau der Landschaft öffnet einen immateriellen Raum, der nur visuell betretbar ist. Eine Präsenz, die sich zugleich entzieht und eine nicht überbrückbare Distanz markiert. Selbst wenn wir mit Physik und Lichtstreuung vertraut sind, geht vom Leuchten des Himmels und Wassers in der Ferne stets aufs Neue eine seltsame Magie aus. Auch die Erklärung des Phänomens kann seinem Zauber nichts anhaben. Gilt das Gleiche nicht auch für ein gutes Bild?

Ein steiler Pfad führt hinab zum See. Ein kleiner Streifen Land, der ins Wasser übergeht. In der Ferne die Silhouetten zweier Stand-Up-Paddler. Ich taste über glitschiges Gestein, bis der Grund unter den Füßen schwindet. Eintauchen in einen weiten, offenen Raum. Leichtigkeit, fast ein Schweben. Dann zurück am Ufer. In sanften, rhythmischen Wogen brandet das Wasser gegen eine Mauer. Wortfetzen wehen heran, vermischen sich mit Stimmen und Bildern in meinem Kopf. Gegenwart und Vergangenheit, Außen und Innen verschwimmen. Und plötzlich sind da auch die lichtdurchfluteten Bilder von Tamina Amadyar, die ich eine Woche zuvor in ihrem Kreuzberger Studio besucht hatte. Die Atmosphäre der Landschaft lässt sie näherrücken.

„A color has many faces“, schreibt Josef Albers. Wenn das zutrifft, arbeitet Tamina Amadyar ihre wechselnden Gesichtsausdrücke in Nahaufnahme heraus. Ihre Bilder bringen Farben in dynamischer Gestik zur Aufführung, lassen sie tanzen und vibrieren wie lebendige Körper. Mit reinem Pigment, gebunden in Hasenleim, schafft die Malerin elektrisierende Farblandschaften von unbestimmbarer Tiefe. Der transparent grundierte, partiell freibleibende Malgrund ist dabei immer auch ein Kompositionselement. Konsequent treten uns auf den meist großformatigen Leinwänden nie mehr als zwei Farben entgegen. Was die beiden auf dem begrenzten Terrain des Bildes scheinbar schwerelos treiben, aktiviert Auge und Raum gleichermaßen. Gelegentlich ringen sie miteinander, doch stets spielerisch. Berührung kann eben auch Reibung bedeuten. Während die Kompositionen klar angelegt sind, entsteht der Flow primär innerhalb der Farbformen und Übergangszonen. Je nach Farbwahl und Malduktus ergibt das Bilder, durch die das Auge spaziert, und andere, durch die es atemlos gejagt wird. Pinselspuren, die sich sanft über eine Leinwand legen. Und Highways der Wahrnehmung, auf denen die Blicke dahinrasen, Richtungswechsel vollziehen und nie zur Ruhe kommen.

Die Gemälde sind eine Feier des Lichts. Sie entstehen in einem schnellen Malprozess auf dem Boden, in einer Mischung aus Kalkül und Intuition, Spannung und Entspannung. Ein kalkulierter Kontrollverlust, Korrektur nicht möglich. Die Basis bilden Filzstiftskizzen, die unterwegs entstehen, gelegentlich Handyfotos. Alltagsextrakte. Aus einem kontinuierlichen Fluss an Eindrücken isoliert Tamina Amadyar, was sich im Netz ihrer subjektiven Wahrnehmung verfängt. So finden Landschaften, räumliche Konstellationen oder ein Gegenstand Eingang in ihre Zeichenbücher, die visuelles Tagebuch und Bildspeicher zugleich sind und einen voluminösen Farb- und Formfundus bereithalten. Motivisches Treibgut, auf das sie oft Jahre später in einem Übersetzungsprozess, der Reduktion und Fragmentierung einschließt, zurückgreift. Alles geht nochmal durch ihren Filter.

Auf den ersten Blick scheinen die Bilder in enger Verwandtschaft zum Colorfield Painting und der Post-Painterly Abstraction der 1950er und 60er Jahre zu stehen. Doch sie sprechen eine eigene Sprache. Während die Protagonist*innen der US-Nachkriegsabstraktion meist darum bemüht waren, die Leinen zu einer außerbildlichen Realität zugunsten eines autonomen Kunstwerks zu kappen, ist das bei Tamina Amadyar anders. Klar, das Bild muss als Bild funktionieren. Doch den kleinen Ankern, die den piktoralen Raum mit ihren eigenen Wirklichkeitserfahrungen, aber auch jenen der Betrachter*innen verbinden, kommt zentrale Bedeutung zu. Es ist eben diese referentielle Spur, durch die sich ihre Arbeit lose mit einer jüngeren Traditionslinie malerischer Praxis verbinden lässt. Trotz unterschiedlicher Stile, Techniken und Fragestellungen – hier weht ein Mary Heilmann, Raoul de Keyser oder Vivian Suter vergleichbarer, autobiographisch grundierter Bildspirit.

Gelegentlich vermitteln Reproduktionen den Eindruck, als handle es sich bei den Arbeiten um kleine, rasche Farbstudien auf Papier. Etwas Spontanes, Skizzenhaftes geht von ihnen aus. Das mag aus dem Zusammenspiel von lockerer Gestik, schlichter Form und reduzierter Farbgebung auf einer nicht vollständig bedeckten Leinwand resultieren. Tritt man den Bildern dann gegenüber, verschieben sich die Größenverhältnisse. Ein Blow up. Auch in den jüngsten Arbeiten begegnen uns keine komplexen kompositorischen Gefüge oder Formelemente. Bislang hatte sich Tamina Amadyar häufig auf sehr wenige Formkonstellationen konzentriert, und diese – wenn auch mit Abweichungen – in unterschiedlichen Farbvarianten und Proportionen durchgespielt. Das hatte trotz Beschränkung etwas Spielerisches, Offenes, weit entfernt vom seriellen Durchdeklinieren spezifischer Bildparameter in der analytischen Malerei. Mit den neuen Bildern, fast durchgängig Hochformate, ist das Formrepertoire gewachsen, hat sich der malerische Handlungsrahmen noch einmal erweitert. Hier treten nun auch prägnante, signethafte Formen auf, in denen eine Prise Pop mitschwingt. Vor allem, wenn die sich die Bilder in dichter Hängung wie Geschwister mit unterschiedlichen Temperamenten im Raum in die Quere kommen – was eine kontemplative Konzentration auf das isolierte Einzelbild verhindert und dessen auratischer Aufladung entgegenwirkt.

living room (2020) ist ein signalhafter Eyecatcher. In seinem intensiven Kadmiumrot, um das sich eine Farbbahn Flaschengrün legt, bildet es ein direktes Gegenüber. Ein Bild mit einem Herzschlag, das einen gleichzeitig anzieht und zurückweist. Doch die zeichenhafte Prägnanz, mit der es in knalliger Farbigkeit und kompakter Gestalt lockt, täuscht – verweigert es doch jede eindeutige Botschaft. Kein Stopschild, eher ein federndes Trampolin. Die breite Linie, die das leuchtende Farbfeld nah am Bildrand locker umschließt, formt weder einen Kreis noch ein Oktagon, sondern irgendetwas dazwischen. Auch sonst finden sich in Tamina Amadyars Werk keine streng geometrisch konstruierten Figuren. Das Organische überwiegt, rechte Winkel oder Symmetrien sucht man vergebens. Irgendetwas ist immer länger, kürzer, breiter oder schmaler, und genau das haucht den Bildern neben der unregelmäßigen Pinselführung Leben ein. Erst durch die kleine Formabweichung erhalten sie ihre unverwechselbare Identität. Und was auf den ersten Blick zentriert wirkt, ist es im Detail nie, sondern driftet leicht verschoben durchs Bildgeviert.

Trotz des prononcierten Umrisses wirkt living room nicht statisch. Eher wie ein nur momenthaft fixierter Zustand. Die breiten, energischen Pinselstriche im Zentrum wirken fast, als stammten sie von einer Farbrolle. Indem die Pigmentdichte zu den Rändern und zur linken Bildmitte abnimmt, wo partiell die Leinwand durchblitzt, deutet der Farbraum Tiefe an. Das Opake weicht einer leichten Transparenz, ein organischer Korridor scheint ins Innere des Energiefeldes zu führen. Mit dem Wohnzimmer verweist der Titel auf den zentralen Raum einer Wohnung, an dem sich Gemeinschaft ereignet. Er ergänzt den warmen Klang des Bildes und verklammert es mit den jüngst entstandenen Aquarellen. Die Titelfindung spielt stets eine wichtige Rolle für die Künstlerin. Sie sagt, sie seien wie weitere Noten, deuten eine Richtung an, geben den Bildern Fahrtwind.

Wäre ihr Werk Literatur, dann keine Prosa. Eher schon ein Haiku. Die Bilder lassen sich in ihren komprimierten Farbakkorden durchaus mit Lyrik in Beziehung setzen. Auch diese kann in verdichteter Form viel transportieren und matter of fact mit der Evokationskraft von Wörtern verbinden. Spinnt man den Gedanken weiter, taucht zum Beispiel William Carlos Williams am Horizont auf. Als Vertreter des Imagism plädierte der US-amerikanische Autor in den 1920er Jahren für eine Befreiung der Lyrik aus ihrem metrischen Korsett und die Emanzipation von traditionellen Vorbildern. Williams schuf eine Dichtung auf dem Boden der Tatsachen, die mit einer Ökonomie der Mittel operiert. Seine Motive fand der dichtende Landarzt in Ausschnitten und Objekten des Kleinstadtalltags, die er mit knappen, präzisen Worten in Sprachbilder transformierte. Das heißt: Konzentration statt Abschweifung, Schnörkellosigkeit statt Metaphorik, Oberfläche statt Tiefe. Die bekannteste seiner poetischen Momentaufnahmen, die Williams auch als glimpses beschrieb, lautet:

so much depends
upon

a red wheel
barrow

glazed with rain
water

beside the white
chickens

Da steht alles, was ein Gedicht braucht, schwarz auf weiß. Mit wenigen Worten zeichnet The Red Wheelbarrow (1923) einen eng kadrierten Realitätsausschnitt. Minimalistischer geht es kaum, und auch nach fast neunzig Jahren glänzt der Regen frisch auf der rot lackierten Schubkarre, während die Hühner weiter picken. Doch je genauer wir das Gedicht betrachten, desto unklarer wird die Szene vor unserem inneren Auge. Letztlich bleibt es ein Bild von enormer Offenheit. Ebenso wie all die anderen Alltagsschnappschüsse von Williams, gleich ob seine Aufmerksamkeit Flaschenscherben, kühlen Pflaumen oder den Nachbarn galt.

Motivisch umkreisen auch die kleinformatigen Aquarelle, die Tamina Amadyar seit Jahresbeginn schuf, ihre unmittelbare Umgebung. In dem der Malerei verwandten Medium ist die Geschwindigkeit entscheidend. So bietet es ein geradezu ideales Spielfeld für eine Künstlerin, die das Irreguläre und ein jeglicher Starre zuwiderlaufendes Moment schätzt. Die wässrige Farbe führt ein expansives Eigenleben, der Zufall spielt eine größere Rolle. Jedes Aquarell ein Experiment mit offenem Ausgang. Es ist das Loslassen, das die Technik so reizvoll wie schwer beherrschbar macht. Was zunächst wie ein Sprung anmutet, stellt eher eine konsequente Fortsetzung von Tamina Amadyars malerischer Praxis dar. Plötzlich tauchen zwar gegenständliche Elemente auf und mit ihnen eine erzählerische Dimension. Auch der eng gesteckte koloristische Aktionsradius erfährt eine Erweiterung. Aber gab es nicht früher schon Bilder von Innenräumen, wenn auch menschenleer? Und eine enorme Farbvielfalt in den Skizzenbüchern?

Während der für die Künstlerin elementare Bezug zum persönlichen Erleben in den Gemälden indirekt Ausdruck findet, fließen nun unverschlüsselter Momente aus ihrem privaten Umfeld ein. Der Fokus gilt dabei gewöhnlichen, eher beiläufigen Situationen und Sujets, die sie fotografisch festhält und später in Aquarell umsetzt. Begrüßungen oder Abschiede, lesende, nachdenkende und tanzende Familienmitglieder. Also das Naheliegende, das unseren eher selten exzeptionellen Alltag ausmacht. Motivisch wechseln dabei Momente von Aktivität mit solchen der Ruhe und inneren Bewegung. Zentral ist die Lebensnähe – wobei der Begriff nicht im Sinne einer akkuraten Wiedergabe verstanden werden sollte.

Mit Interieurs, Porträts und Stillleben knüpft die Künstlerin an Bildgattungen an, die vor allem im 19. Jahrhundert eine Blüte in der Aquarellmalerei erlebten. Statt deren hochnuancierte Farbabstufungen und feine Strichführung zu wiederholen, reizt sie die expressive Bandbreite des Mediums zwischen hastigen Lineaturen, eruptiven Setzungen und weichem Zerfließen aus. Die in Ausschnitten und leichter Aufsicht gezeigten Motive haben teils etwas von zerlaufenden Schnappschüssen, die sich expansiv über den Blattrand ausdehnen möchten. In ihren Details spielen sich effektreiche Farbdramen ab. Entsprechend groß ist auch der Abstraktionsgrad der menschlichen Figur. Es geht nicht um die Identifizierbarkeit von Personen, eher lassen sich die Aquarelle als Porträts von Stimmungen beschreiben. Während viele der Arbeiten eine heitere Atmosphäre evozieren, durchzieht eine melancholische Stimmung soli (2020). Das Aquarell zeigt eine womöglich schlaflose, in leicht versunkenener Haltung im Bett sitzende Figur. Der Kopf nicht mehr als zwei, drei diffuse Farbflecke. Ihre zackenhafte Frisur verschmilzt nahezu mit der brauntönigen Wand im Hintergrund, die ihre innere Unruhe in ausfransenden Farbflecken zu visualisieren scheint. Die Szene wirkt, als könne sie jeden Moment ganz verschwimmen. Formgenese und Formauflösung sind im Wechsel begriffen. In seiner Instabilität scheint das Blatt so zugleich auch wie ein Sinnbild für den stets lückenhaften Prozess der Erinnerung.

Die Beschäftigung mit dem Aquarell hat auch Folgen für Tamina Amadyars malerische Praxis. In ihren Gemälden tauchen nun vereinzelt Partien auf, in denen sich die Farbe verselbstständigt und der breite, klar konturierte Pinselstrich an den Rändern aquarellhaft ausfranst. Ein solcher durch Verdünnung erreichter Effekt lässt sich stellenweise auch im querformatigen blue world (2020) ausmachen.

Ein Bild wie ein Sommertag in Cinemascope. Im Zentrum dehnt sich eine azurblaue Fläche aus, eingebettet in orangefarbene, wolkenhaft ausbuchtende Farbfelder, von denen ein warmes Leuchten ausgeht. Ein pulsierender Komplementärkontrast. Beide Farben machen keinen Halt an den seitlichen Bildrändern, was wie ein Verstärker der Szenerie wirkt, die Assoziationen an eine Landschaft aufruft. Erstreckt sich nicht im Vordergrund ein abfallender Hang gen Wasser, während ein langgezogener Berg das obere Bilddrittel im Hintergrund abschließt?

Alles ist in Bewegung. Während die äußeren Konturen der beiden orangenen Farbfelder annähernd parallel zu den Bildrändern verlaufen, schwingen sie zur Bildmitte hin in großen Bögen aus. Eine unruhige Pinselführung unterstreicht die Bilddynamik. In langen, transluzenten Farbbahnen, die sanfte Wellenbewegungen suggerieren, legt sich Blau horizontal durchs Bild, überdeckt das Orange und lässt es wie aus einer unbestimmten Tiefe leuchten. Wo die beiden Farben aufeinandertreffen, entstehen Partien, die ins Violette, Rostbraune oder Grünliche tendieren. Die Intensität der Farbaufträge changiert stark. Indem beide zur Bildmitte hin abnehmen, das Orange fast lachsfarben erscheint und das Blau ins Türkis driftet, entsteht eine bewegte, schräg durchs Bild laufende Lichtzone. Eine Landschaft, die im Sonnenlicht badet. Während man meint, im unteren Bilddrittel durch klares Wasser bis auf den Grund sehen zu können, erscheint das vom Blau überdeckte Orange im oberen Bilddrittel als Spiegelung des vermeintlichen Berges. In der dreiteiligen Anlage des Bildes hallt ein Kompositionsmuster nach, das Amadyar nach einer Reise an die US-amerikanische Westküste 2018 entwickelt hatte. Hier quasi in die Horizontale gekippt, ergibt sich sofort die Lesart Landschaft. blue world ist in Farbgebung und grafischer Vereinfachung etwas zu sehr Pop, um eine meditative Versenkung zu erlauben. Und dennoch entfaltet das Bild beim Anblick eine kühlende Sogkraft.

Überhaupt, das Blau. Wie ein Faden zieht es sich durch Tamina Amadyars Bildwelt. Häufig ist es in Ausstellungstiteln präsent, mal direkt als Big Blue Sky, mal indirekt wie bei Making Waves. Die besondere Affinität zu dieser Farbe verbindet sie in gewisser Weise mit Helen Frankenthaler, die eines ihrer Bilder ebenfalls mit Out of the Blue betitelte. Die Künstlerin, die Mitte des letzten Jahrhunderts die Farbfeldmalerei erst so richtig zum Laufen brachte, sagte einmal: „My pictures are full of climates, abstract climates and not nature per se, but a feeling. And the feeling of an order that is associated more with nature.“ Indem sie die Wetteranalogie mit dem subjektiven Empfinden koppelt, verweist sie auf eine für ihre Arbeit zentrale Dimension. Eine ähnliche Sensibilität für die emotionalen Ausdrucksqualitäten der Farbe, ihre Vitalität und Sinnlichkeit spricht auch aus Tamina Amadyars Malerei. Die kraftvollsten ihrer scheinbar lässig dahingeworfenen Bilder katapultieren uns so mühelos wie ein Popsong momenthaft an einen anderen Ort, während wir doch dem Hier und Jetzt verhaftet bleiben.

Ohrenbetäubender Lärm reißt mich aus meinen Gedanken. Ein Helikopter gleitet übers Seeufer, sein Rotor zeichnet konzentrische Ringe auf die dunkle, bedrohlich wirkende Wasseroberfläche. Es ist kühl geworden, das Wetter kurz davor umzuschlagen. Ich mache mich auf den Weg. Und denke leise summend an die letzte Zeile von Neil Youngs Out of the blue, die auf den Punkt bringt, das sich vieles, was scheinbar klar vor Augen steht, rein rational dann doch nicht greifen lässt – „There’s more to the picture than meets the eye.“